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Issue 14

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Issue 14 is out now! Click Here for the ONLINE version of issue 14!

Don’t miss Black Poppy’s unique hard copy magazine -available now and posted to anywhere in the world. Catch up on the latest news, views and lifestyle issues with one of the worlds best loved drug user magazines; exclusively created and produced by users for users.   If drugs influence your lifestyle – then you need BP magazine for the latest news, stories and articles on drug use. Click here for more info on the mag and whats inside.

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Employing People Who Use Drugs

And why it is a good idea!

Introducing a Good practice guide for employing people who use drugs .

A truly indispensable toolkit.
PWUD (People Who Use Drugs) have insights and expertise that can help inform the planning, delivery, monitoring and review of harm reduction and many other drug related services. When we involve PWUD in the design and delivery of services for our community, the overall work becomes more relevant, targeted and accessible. Working in partnership with PWUD helps services to reach and connect with other PWUD more effectively, and importantly, to understand and meet their needs.

A really powerful way of involving PWUD is to employ them as staff.

EmployingPWUDs_guide1

Employing PWUD sends out a clear message that they are valued partners and are welcome at all levels of service delivery. It also has a very practical set of benefits, helping services to better understand the needs and lived experience of PWUD. PWUD have the right to be employed. Policies that routinely exclude PWUD from the workplace are discriminatory.
This guide has been carefully and thoughtfully written and involved the community of people who use drugs in its design and execution.  It provides really excellent information in the form of a practical toolkit that services themselves can and should use when it comes to considering the employment of PWUD’s in services.

It is true, there are unique issues that PWUDs may bring to the workplace if / when employed. However, the really interesting insights,  ideas, and approaches a service will experience from engaging PWUDs is sure to make the extra effort of learning how to structure the work environment, all the more worthwhile.

This guide also has really well thought out and evidenced based information for ensuring that PWUDs who are engaged as volunteers or mentors in any service, are able to deliver their very best, and are properly supported and compensated by the service they work hard for.

It is essential that people who are still actively using drugs, and those who are relatively stable in treatment  -are recognised as able to make a valuable contribution to the development of our communities drug and alcohol services! It is a field that should not be exclusively for people ‘in recovery’, and as this guide will show, there are many valid reasons why the entire community of people who use drugs all have valuable roles to play in giving us better quality drug and alcohol services.

Here are just some of the topics discussed in this excellent guide. Make sure every drug service is aware of its existence.

2.2. When drug use is a problem (and when it is not)
2.4. Employing ex-drug users and people in recovery
2.4.1. Employing people who are engaged in OST and drug treatment
2.4.2. Employing people who are active drug users
2.4.3. Employing people who are active stimulant users
2.5. The value of staff who use drugs

4.2. Problem drug use and work
4.3. Imposing personal models and philosophies of drug use
4.5. Moving from being a peer to working in a harm reduction organisation
4.6. Inappropriate relationships with clients
4.7. Supplying, or soliciting the supply of, illicit drugs
4.8. When peer support groups become unhealthy
4.9. Managing staff with health conditions that impact on performance
4.10. Managing a death in the workforce or among the client group

Appendix 3: Risk assessment circle
Appendix 5: Examples of job advertisements for staff who use drugs and peer outreach workers
Appendix 6: Model questions for peer interviewers
Appendix 7: Conducting a review meeting
Appendix 8: Developing a self-control programme
Appendix 9: Checklist for managing staff with problem drug use at work
Appendix 10: Training exercises from the Bangkok workshop
Appendix 11: Normal and complex grief reactions

Save yourself a copy and spread it around the staff in the drug services you know -you never know -you might get a job there one day!

NOTE: This guide came out at the end of 2016 and I have written about it before however it was hidden on our website so I thought it should be pulled out again and given a front page showing. I hope you will agree it will be a useful guide for some years to come.

International Remembrance Day, 21st July -For those who have died from the War on Drugs – which is a war on people!


This is a speech spoken at a Remembrance Day event in London yesterday. It gives a personal point of view looking at how the War on Drugs -which is a war on people in every part of the world that has been happening for almost 100 years! Here is just one persons story of being inside this insane maelstrom.

My Name is Anna

My name is Anna and I call myself a drug user activist.

I have been a drug injector for over 30 years and a drug user activist for more than half of that.

In that time – like many of us here today – I have seen a lot of things….

And, like many of us here – I have also had some extraordinary relationships, encounters and random chances with many, many people who used drugs.

People who, for the most part – were not dodgy or crazy – well maybe just a little –

Who were not dirty,  lying or cheating horrible people –

But mostly passionate, caring, sensitive and generous people. People who – yes they may have been pushed to the brink –marginalised and isolated by a society that had to criminalise before it cared – judged before it understood; people who should have received better protection from our drug policies – rather than annihilation…..

People who I have loved and cared about, like we all have –and this is why we are here on this very important day today.

As a drug user activist for many years now I have given speeches and presentations at lots of places all over the country –and while every presentation is different – but this one is special.

It is special because this is the one time I can honestly truly stand up and say – loud and proud – how grateful and how fortunate I am to have made friendships with some of the best people in the world – other drug users – fuck – other junkies! – wonderful, courageous people who have often battled huge odds to still be here – today – and many who are literally here today and in this audience.

People who have found each other, often initially through their enjoyment or pain, their that sharing of an illegal substance. You might say prohibition has brought many of us together.

But prohibition has also meant that –many of these very same people – these special, wild and crazy characters – are NOT here today.

Because they are DEAD. Those people –and we all knew someone – who died directly because our insane drug policies continue to make the same mistakes over and over again – day in and day out –while people like I have just mentioned – die!

Think about this: every minute of every day –someones brother or sister is crying out for methadone but cant get it because (like in Russia) they have an idea that it should be kept illegal to stop drug users indulging themselves.

That someones father is being bundled up in a rug in Guatemala and kidnapped by a quazy religious cult who have financially fleeced the relatives by selling a story that incarceration in a blacked out house – against a persons will is the only way to save someone from drugs.

And that – in the filipines a childs mother and father have been shot dead in the street by a vigilante public who cheer the bandits on and tie big signs round their dead necks calling them pushers.

While here in London someones best buddy overdoses alone in a half way hostel because they are using benzos on top of the shitty blackmarket heroin that available in an effort to drown out the misery of life criminalized after yet another prison sentence.

Prohibition is killing our community – over and over, to quickly to count the numbers –only through days like this do we have an opportunity to really reflect on who these policies are really affecting –in real time.

The anger is real – no doubt about that – it is why I became a drug user activist. But I just want to quickly tell you –being an angry activist didn’t happen overnight. It was an accumulation of several lightbulb moments that happened to me – that made me realise – OMG – I do not deserve shit treatment from people and services just because I use drugs and supposedly broke a few rules.

I used to think – well, what could I expect if I did the wrong thing. Jeezus, surely I couldn’t expect to be treated well? I was in the wrong, after all. I didn’t see then that societys label of junkie –and all its connotations – ran so deeply in people – that I was being judged and sentenced by their ignorance.

Ignorance that could literally put my life at risk.

Ill just tell you very quickly about 2 of those litebulb moments:

The first one happened after I had just been diagnosed HIV positive –it was in 1995 and things were different back then –but stigma is stigma and it is still rife today as we know –no matter what its shade or location.

So, 1995, and it was 6 weeks after I had been diagnosed –my first dr appoint. And I went with to this dr appoint –in fact I went with my mum –and I was met by a female dr who proceeded to  hammer me, in the most humiliating way, with a series of 100 questions about my drug use, whether I was sharing needles, did I have anal sex –all delivered with the most accusatory tone I was stunned into virtual silence! My mum –after she picked herself and me – metaphorically -off the floor –said ‘excuse me – I don’t appreciate you speaking to my daughter in that way’; and later, after we left and went for coffee, I realized –what she in fact was brimming with –was a judgement: I was guilty, I was a junky, I had brought this on myself. I was the non deserving.

And I realized in a flash: OMG – I had gone to this dr as an open book – as vulnerable as one can be – we both were – I felt like my life was in her hands –and that she didn’t want it. I wasn’t like everyone else – I really was ‘the other’ and this could literally affect my life now.

It was a lightbulb moment.

Later when a friend and I were bemoaning the fact that there were no drug users speaking on world aids day, considering how we had seen its impact on the injecting community; my friend Andrea, had just been telling me about her husband who had just died of aids. How incredibly courageous he was (in fact John mordant was one of several drug user activists in the world who formed the first front line of user activism back in early 1990s.- also started Mainliners) And that it really felt like there was nowhere for people like him to be welcomed, understood, appreciated –like there was for gay men at the time.

She said to me pointedly “ Because we have heroes too”.

And tears started to well up in my eyes because all of a sudden I thought about all the wonderful people I knew, some of whom were now dead –who never got the appreciation, the respect, the support even the funeral they should have got – just because they used an illegal substance.

But as I said – drug user activism helps me to channel my anger, and has helped me to fight back in constructive ways rather than remaining in a self destructive spiral of guilt, confusion, thwarted ambition, rage.

And days like today are an inspiration – to see all the wonderful people I deeply respect here today –and to celebrate the lives of those who –tragically – and for which there really are no words – are not here today –

Thank you all for coming today to remember those who lived life on the edge –in ways we all sometimes dream about doing but don’t dare –

We will keep remembering them all.

Dedicated to Raffi Ballian – a Canadian masterclass of an activist who died of an overdose this year.

Pretty Pills? I knew it!

Some light relief for the pill munchers amongst us…Pills like we have never seen them before, honest!

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fstreetartglobe%2Fvideos%2F2023166277906788%2F&show_text=1&width=560

Apologies for the recent quiet.

Hi everyone,

I just wanted to thank so many of you for hanging with us over the months that we have not been posting. The website is way over due for a makeover which will get done this year, and more updates are needed with our information as the drugs discourse and health, changes over time etc.

Just a word to say we are still here, personal circumstances have made attention to the blog/site difficult but we are back and have read all your comments, and when we update our pages we will incorporate the most commonly asked questions into our write-ups.

Thanks again for hanging around, we are here and will start attending to your comments over the coming weeks.

In solidarity,

The (very small) BP Crew

Trafficking in Drug Users

Hi friends,

I just came across this old article/ presentation I wrote some years back about my own treatment journey (nightmare might be a better word!) and how so much idiocy, money, misguided support and policies, ignorance, do-gooders, moralising shits, and the whole web of the incredibly resourced, career inflating, gravy train that is the current drug and alcohol treatment /criminal justice interwoven system, is stitched up so tight across the globe, that it is going to take a hell of a lot of strategising for us to get out from under the intensity and chains of the current goal of ‘managing and controlling’ people who use drugs, in any way possible -and how carreers and reputations ride on this these days – the research, the papers, the positions in clinics and academy’s, the psychology and the ‘experts’ draining cash from everyone hand over fist with the misguided or embossed descriptions that they will ‘fix’ and cure your loved one, yourself, your child before it has even smoked a cigarette!  We are taught year by year, harder, longer and stronger – that we are weak, we have no control over our desires anymore, that we cannot do it ourselves – we HAVE to have professional help….Yet what of the professional help? The basic, colourless, inflexible, unchangeable, plain and homogenous, evidenceless help….my God, what a load of crock so much of it all is – and still – they never seem to ask us what we need. What would help. We just get encouraged to join into more peer pressure and trot out the same old slogans that we believe are right coz our old peers say so (12 steps etc). 

When is it EVER the right way to provide one solution for everyone no matter what where how when why they use drugs? in 2016, we are still one leg firmly in the dark friends….Sad alright. But it just shows – the only way is to get active – get politicised, get smart.

Hope you like it (bit dated now!)

Here – One of the BEST sites for resources on progressive ideas about drug use / treatment -based in UK – The SMMGP (includes forum, resources, GP chatter and much more).

RCGP Special Interest Masterclass Presentation

Originally entitled ‘Don’t Give Them What They Want’.

EO;  Editor Black Poppy Magazine, Written /presented July 2003

I left my home of Australia 10 years ago trying to find a way to get off heroin. I thought the beautiful scenery in Europe might inspire me, I thought London might show me a new way of looking at life. I thought I might find something that would interest me more than heroin. But I should have known that doing what many of my peers call a ‘geographical’ is very rarely the answer.

I had already been to a variety of treatment clinics and surgeries in Australia. I had hadpoppies_final_black5.jpg habits on heroin, cocaine, benzo’s, and a few other pharmaceuticals, but my treatment options, no matter where I went, were methadone, methadone and more methadone. I felt screwed by the time I came to England. I felt numb and I wasn’t well either. By the time I arrived, I was hanging out, sick, extremely tired and depressed and went to a hospital looking for some relief. I was offered a two week blind detox on methadone. Suffice to say, I remained sick. I felt like I was trapped and my head just kept wanting to be well. I was in a new city and hoping to find a bit of peace of mind, I had to begin to learn the ropes of the British prescribing system. Suffice to say, it has taken me another 10 years to finally land on my feet, with a script that suits me, Erin O’Mara, an individual with individual needs. After almost 20 years I can now look to a future – that’s what a tailored prescription has really meant.

To get to this point, I have attended around 10 different methadone programmes, 2 heroin prescribing programmes, seen numerous GP’s (both private and NHS), and sat with plenty of psych nurses, key workers, social workers, psychiatrists and counselors. I’ve been to rehabs in the country and detoxs in the city, made plenty of attempts at stabilizing and fought to come off completely with concoctions of pills gathered from anyone who would give them too me or suing acupuncture, massages and herbal teas. It wasn’t that I didn’t try. I really did. Everything was riding on it. My life, my health, my liberty. But I just kept coming back to the same old blanket prescribing of methadone linctus – a drug that, while I know it helps many people, it isn’t for all of us. Drug users are not born from the same mold, we all use for different reasons, we all take different drugs, we take differing amounts of different drugs and offering us variations on the same methadone theme, while helping many, is still going to leave thousands of us out in the cold. And how long can we afford to stay frozen out?

For many drug users, getting on the treatment rollercoaster means you are certainly in for a ride and a half. I have learnt that the right prescription is only half of the equation – the other half is the treatment and understanding you receive from your prescriber. It can be so hard to explain to some prescribers that it is the creation of the types of prescribing systems -that can cause so much difficulty in adhering to it. The clinics that offer only a 2 week break or holiday a year (no opportunities to mend familial bridges there then), the confusion or distrust around your intentions, the reducing of your script every time you take something else or have a need to top up your dose, having to turn up for dosing at inflexible times -whether you have to pick up your kids or go to work or uni or like being closely watched as you sit for 3 hours on a toilet to give a urine sample before you’re allowed to get your dose. I’ve been to a clinic where a girl burnt off her tracks with a cigarette because she was afraid the doctor would cut down their methadone if they found out she was still using on top. And, at that particular clinic, sadly she would have been right. Getting the treatment dose right is essential, finding the drug that suits that individual is critical, allowing room for maneuver or looking for other drug treatment alternatives is the most important of all.

chrispolice

Your nicked!

Since leaving Australia where we were all prescribed methadone – no options, no alternatives to coming to the UK where there was some room for maneuver with prescribing has been an interesting experience. Heroin has always been my drug of choice and for me, methadone linctus just didn’t work. It didn’t work for me in Australia and it wasn’t working for me here. I looked everywhere for a more suitable script. I’ve tried morphine, slow release tablets and ampoules – which, while being a welcome relief from methadone, I found it incredibly constipating and uncomfortable and found myself again, unhappy, not wanting to take it and looking for something else. I will never forget that particular doctor who was then the first one to actually sit down with me and talk to me about what it was I felt I needed. But while we both knew it was probably a diamorphine script, he was powerless to offer me it. Thus he offered me what we thought was the next best thing. Morphine. It wasn’t that I didn’t want it to work, I did, more than anything else in the world, but it just wasn’t suitable for me.

It is so important to be able to offer alternatives to drug users when they come in looking for treatment. Generalisations about drugs and drug users are made without considering how cultural differences mediate and transform both the reality and meaning of a persons drug use. Younger users, older users, women, men, mothers, those on parole or probation, those with HIV and or Hep C, injectors, smokers, pill takers and snorters – how can we expect to support an individual with a chemical dependence if we are only prepared to offer them methadone?

It has taken years for methadone to be accepted by doctors, and still it is only by a minority. Without question it clearly works for some people and it certainly has a place in prescribing options. But there are other alternatives. At Black poppy we are receiving many letters about how helpful Subutex has been (mainly for detoxing) but many more letters from people wanting to know how they can encourage their doctor to prescribe it. We all know its out there but where? How can one be prescribed it or is it too a lottery depending on your area or GP?

Morphine also holds an important place but is usually prescribed by private doctors and is prohibitively expensive. I have a good friend who has tried methadone unsuccessfully many times and finally went to a private doctor to try and get MST’s or slow release morphine sulphate tablets. Because he can’t stomach methadone linctus and doesn’t want to inject methadone ampoules, his morphine script has meant every fortnight he has to resort to spending literally his entire benefit cheque on paying his chemist and his doctor and is still fifteen pounds short. His clothes are old, his cupboards are empty and he is fighting off a depression that threatens to jeopardize his whole stability. This is because he cannot find a single NHS doctor in his area to prescribe him morphine tablets – despite his private doctor offering support. The last time I saw him he was eating the only thing he had in his cupboard – tomato paste. Why?

There are many people who have either dropped out of the prescribing system altogether or regularly have to top up with additional drugs because the system just isn’t geared for those with poly drug dependencies. While years ago many people just seemed to stick to using one or two drugs at a time, these days poly drug use has become the norm. How are doctors going to help support people if they can’t or won’t take on anyone who was multiple drug problems. This is 2003 and this is the way drugs are now taken. Both patients and doctors must be prepared to be open and have the courage to admit when something isn’t working and be flexible when considering alternatives. It isn’t easy. I know drug users can be difficult patients. When that doctor sitting opposite you seems to have the power to change your life – things do and can get emotional. For treatments to work we all have to be open and honest. The system has to let you be open and not punish you for what it sees as ‘not conforming to the treatment’. Relapsing is part of stabilizing as well as part of ‘the cure’.

For me, after years of searching for some stability – I was finally offered the chance to try diamorphine – or heroin on a script. It is extremely rare to get this chance and I believe the deciding factor was because I had recently contracted HIV.

Heroin is provided on prescription in what was known as 'The British System'

Now I’ve had the opportunity to participate in 2 very different approaches to heroin prescribing – and it has taught me a great deal about how the differing structures, regulations and nuances behind the way heroin is administered to users, is critical to the success of the programme. For example: The first heroin script I received was back in 98, through a pilot project in London, whose aim it was to study the effectiveness of prescribing either pharmaceutical heroin, or methadone in injectable form to drug users.

The first error and one eventually admitted, was to limit the amount of diamorphine prescribed, to an unmanageably low 200mg. (The Swiss, The Dutch and others, myself included, have found 400 – 1000mg much more suitable). Pharmaceutical heroin does not have a long half life and to seriously underestimate the dosages required was to become a momentous error and one that would seriously jeopardise a person’s ability to adhere to their prescription. With a median age range of 38 and an average injecting career of 19 years, many clients at this project had other drug problems, such as crack, benzodiazepines, alcohol or cocaine which I don’t fully believe were taken on board at the time. The severely punitive clinic regulations or ‘protocols’, would bear this out. i.e. anyone caught using any other drugs or ‘topping up’ their rather limited dose, would immediately be ‘sanctioned’ by way of a 30mg reduction in ones daily prescription, reducing even further ones ability to adhere to the programme. Once ones prescription began to lower, it was practically impossible not to ‘top up’ with something else, and so clients, myself included, were locked in a constant spiral of script alterations.

A stifling clinic environment would be the clinics 2nd fundamental error, where people would be unable to talk about their other drug issues for fear of a variety of repercussions. This would lead to an even more alarming situation where clients hid serious medical issues for fear of their prescription being stopped or being transferred back to methadone linctus.

The importance of maintaining an environment where users can talk openly and honestly to their keyworkers and consultants is a crucial element in a person’s success on any drug treatment programme and this was no exception. A deeply unhappy client group had nowhere to go to complain about their treatment and having to attend to such a stressful and demoralising project promptly each morning in order to receive ones medication only exacerbated people’s and my own depression and did little if nothing to improve the spirits of those attending.

Two years later, after a desperately unsuccessful period trying an injectable methadone prescription, I had developed a dire crack problem, was drinking alcohol regularly for the first time in my life, and began having regular seizures from increased benzodiazepine use.

It was at this time that, after an enormous effort and support from my GP Chris Ford, my mum, my local MP, (and bailing up the prescribing doctor at a conference I attended), I managed to secure a place at London’s Maudsley hospital, where there was a doctor prescribing heroin to a small group of patients. I clearly remember my sense of complete and total desperation. I felt I could not go on any longer, that if they didn’t help me I would be – I didn’t know where I would be and that was the trouble. I felt that this was my last hope, that I’d tried everything. And I begged…. Most drug users know well the feeling of someone else, a doctor, having the power of your life in their hands, every single day. A script started or terminated making the difference between life and death, or misery and hope. Sometimes you end up having to beg…

I have now been on my heroin script for 2_ years. My health has improved substantially and my HIV doctor is delighted – as is my mum and I. My moods and energy levels have improved considerably and so has my ability to contribute to life and my community. I founded and continue to work on what has become a National drug users’ magazine called Black Poppy, and I am actively involved in drug user politics, journalism and harm reduction issues. It has been a difficult journey, but thanks to my mum, my mates and the open-mindedness of my doctor, who fully engages me in my treatment decisions and doesn’t wave punishments in my face, I have stabilized and am well, for the first time in 18years of using opiates.

Now, I have somewhat of a vested interest in the campaign towards prescribing heroin – both here and overseas. Last year, my mum returned to Australia to live and while I would have liked to go with her, the thought of losing my heroin script after fighting so hard to get it, felt more than I could bear. I am HIV positive. There are going to be times when I will want to be near my family. Yet archaic laws in Australia forbid me from even entering the country with my prescription. How can this be legal? Anyone, on any other medication, would be permitted to continue that medication in another country but these basic human rights do not extend to drug users. The intense and totally unfounded hysteria that surrounds the prescribing of heroin to drug users sadly endures and has made the campaign to prescribe heroin in Australia a momentous task. Yet while campaigners look to the British System for guidance, it would be a mistake not to closely examine both its failings and successes. The potential for problems in importing a system that hasn’t been culturally fine tuned for the British using community are great because to get it wrong, Britain may lose the chance to ever attempt it on a large scale again. The Swiss users have to return to their heroin prescribing clinic 3 times a day to receive their heroin, watched over as they inject by a clinic nurse. Although the Swiss programme has had incredibly positive results, would English users blossom under such a severe restriction of an individual’s freedom? Or if the dosage is not allowed to be adjusted to suit each individual, as occurred before at the London clinic, what chance is there of success?

While there is undoubtedly a role for the prescribing of heroin to heroin users, it is important to remember how crucial the role of the heroin user is in the planning, implementation and evolution of a heroin programme – or any drug treatment programme for that matter. Users must be involved every step of the way and accepted, as other users of health services are, as an integral part of a treatment programmes development, with rights, responsibilities and a mutual respect for experience.

I know I’m fortunate. As an Aussie living in London, there are times when I have to pinch myself that this is real – I have a diamorphine prescription!. That the long and often harrowing road of ‘substitute prescribing’ has finally come to an end – and now I’m free to think about my future. But in the small silences that fall between me counting my blessings, I can’t help but wonder whether it’s all just been a bit to little, a bit too late. I question why it has taken 18 long years to get here? Why did I have to wait until I’d been chewed up and spat out of over 10 different treatment programmes and Dr’s surgeries, of at least 4 rehabs and an uncountable number of detox attempts? Why did I have to wait until I’d ‘finished’ selling my young body to men, til I’d got sick and deeply depressed, til I’d used every vein in my body from my neck to my feet, til I’d contracted both HIV and Hep C? Yet doctors can prescribe heroin to people who are opiate dependent in the UK and indeed they have recently been encouraged to by our current Home secretary, David Blunkett. Are doctors prepared to start looking at other alternatives? Is the government going to stand behind them? Support each other – doctors who are prepared to look at other options – keep each other updated. As a drug user, I know what its like to be on the other side of the fence – and as a drug user, I also know there are courageous doctors out there who are trying to do their best but are often working in isolation, with little support.

bppicnunsmall1.jpgMeanwhile, 96% of all opiate based prescriptions given out to British users, remains methadone and only 449 people currently receive a heroin prescription for opiate dependence. And I am one of them.

Unfortunately, I still hear the saying, ‘Don’t give them what they want’. But it’s not about want anymore. It’s about need and it’s about our lives. I would just like to take this opportunity to thank those doctors who did go that little bit further and treated me and my needs individually. Their support has got me the prescription I needed and has allowed me to be here today.One day we might have a system that doesn’t insist on me being sick and dysfunctional from the get-go and asks the big questions like ‘Why do we have a society / laws, that push substance users to the brink of insanity and outside the margins of society just because they prefer opiates instead of whiskey, a little stimulation from khat chewing instead of 20 cups of ‘legal’ coffee.

 

Addendum: The drug conventions are based on a lot of hot air and bullshit friends, the more you look back into history and the closer you inspect the world of economics, society, and criminal justice today, the more you unravel a mish-mash of men in suits making decisions decided by money, history, fear and racism, certainly not strong evidence, humanity and common sense.

– Erin

Editor Black poppy Magazine

Ibogaine update

Well readers, I have a treat for you!

Ten years ago David Graham Scott (whom we have written about and written with on this website) screened a very personal documentary on channel

Documentary filmmaker David Graham Scott on his journey to rid himself of heroin and methadone addiction. David during the dream phase of the Ibogaine drug. Copyright david gillanders_photography 2003 Not to be reproduced, printed or published without prior consent from David Gillanders. m_ + 44 (0)7974 920 189 e_ david@davidgillanders.com

Documentary filmmaker David Graham Scott on his journey to rid himself of heroin and methadone addiction. Above: David during the dream phase of the Ibogaine drug in the film Detox or Die. Copyright 

4, about his own experience as a person struggling to finally quit using methadone -by using ibogaine. The film Detox or Die has since been viewed many, many thousands of times on the web and at film festivals and conferences. It is a really interesting, personal and thoughtful film about his attempt to embrace the spirit of Iboga, by using a guide, who stayed with him throughout the entire two day ordeal, something he filmed entirely.

Well, my treat for you in David’s follow up film made 10 years later. David not only talks about his own experience of staying drug free since then but he looks at Ibogaine in other treatment settings -one persons actual DIY treatment to cure their heroin addiction, another couple of guys who embarked on a ‘journey with ‘a guide’ whom they paid a couple of thousand pounds, someone who bailed halfway through the treatment, as well as talking to some other dependent drug users about kicking their habit and their hopes for ibogaine working for them.

Portrait of filmmaker David Graham Scott today

Portrait of filmmaker David Graham Scott today

It is a classic piece of work, expertly made by a pro, we are dead proud of him here at BP and happily I can provide you with the link to watch not just Detox or Die but the more recent Iboga Nites -which came out in 2013. David has already won numerous awards for the film and it should spark interest and debate for some time to come. Well worth a watch for anyone remotely interested in detoxing or the subject of drugs.

This comes from David’s website detailing information on the film Iboga Nites

“The psychedelic plant root hails from Africa where it has been used in religious ceremonies through countless generations. A burgeoning movement in the west has promoted iboga as a quick fix route to painless withdrawal.

Now David wants to find out how truly effective iboga is. In a Dutch suburb several addicts embark on the long night of psychedelic detox under the watchful eye of an experienced Iboga practitioner. One client collapses and ends up on life-support, the provider is jailed and David starts to question the safety of iboga treatment.

 The film culminates with a nerve-wracking iboga session in London where the director himself administers the treatment. How does the filmmaker weigh up the ethics of involving himself so deeply in this controversial detox option and what will be his final resolve on the efficacy of it?”

IBOGA NIGHTS from David Graham Scott on Vimeo.

Drug Consumption Rooms

Here is a video I just wanted to share with you all, it was made in the UK by one of our treasured harm reduction /drug workers Phillipe Bonnet in Birmingham and he presents a very honest (and difficult to watch at times) account of why we need drug consumption rooms all across the world – particularly in the UK today. We have yet to open such a facility in the UK -it makes no sense to shy away from such a simple, straightforward solution. Our pal Neil Hunt talks about cost and why DCR’s are not that expensive and that they could hook onto needle exchanges as they already appear. Why not? How much longer can we look the other way when we have the solution in our very hands -solutions with the evidence base to back it up. As Dr Judith Yates in the film says “A simple intervention like this early on, can prevent all this damage later on”.

A word from the film-makers – Published on 23 Oct 2012

This Documentary invites the audience to see the harsh reality of ‘street injecting’ drug users in the UK’s second city Birmingham. The presenter Philippe Bonnet explores this subject by interviewing outreach workers, health care professionals and current and ex drug-users. The film shows how other countries around the world have found a solution to this and as a result have reduced harms and costs associated with this phenomenon and ultimately helped drug users access treatment and begin their recovery.

 

Recovery In The Bin – 18 Principles

Readers, check out these folk at ‘Recovery In The Bin’ and their ’18 Key Principles’ Manifesto, agreed and adopted by group members on 6th February 2015. I think the community of people in treatment could take a lot from this -when we make our own manifesto against…let’s see…I know! Against the ‘Trafficking of People who Use Drugs inside and outside the Drug and Alcohol Treatment Sector’! 

Take it away comrades in arms; 

We oppose the ways in which the concept of ‘recovery’ has been colonised by mental health services, commissioners and policy makers.

  • We believe the growing development of this form of the ‘Recovery Model’ is a symptom of neoliberalism, and capitalism is the crisis! Many of us will never be able to ‘recover’ living under these intolerable social and economic conditions, due to the effects of social and economic circumstances such as poor housing, poverty, stigma, racism, sexism, unreasonable work expectations, and countless other barriers.
  • We believe “UnRecovered” is a valid and legitimate self-definition, and we emphasise its political and social contrast to “Recovered”. This doesn’t mean we want to remain ‘unwell’ or ‘ill’, but that we reject the new neoliberal intrusion on the word ‘recovery’ that has been redefined, and taken over by market forces, humiliating treatment techniques and atomising outcome measurements.
  • We are critical of tools such as “Recovery Stars” as a means of measuring ‘progress’ as they represent a narrow & judgemental view of wellness and self-definition. We do not believe outcome measures are a helpful way to steer policy, techniques or services towards helping people cope with mental distress
  • We believe that mental health services are using ‘recovery’ ideology to mask greater coercion. For example, the claim that Community Treatment Orders are imposed as a “step towards recovery”.
  • We demand that no one is put under unnecessary pressure or unreasonable expectations to ‘recover’ by mental health services. For example, being discharged too soon or being pushed into inappropriate employment.
  • We object to therapeutic techniques like ‘mindfulness’ and “positive thinking” being used to pacify patients and stifle collective dissent.
  • We propose to spread awareness of how neoliberalism and market forces shape the way mental health ‘recovery’ is planned and delivered by services, including those within the voluntary sector.
  • We want a robust ‘Social Model of Madness & Distress’, from the left of politics, placing mental health within the context of the wider class struggle. We know from experience and evidence that capitalism and social inequality can be bad for your mental health.
  • We demand an immediate halt to the erosion of the welfare state, an end to benefits cuts, delays and sanctions, and the abolishment of ‘Work Capability Assessments’ & ‘Workfare’, which are both unfit for purpose. As a consequence of austerity, people are killing themselves, and policy-makers must be held to account.
  • We want genuine non-medicalised alternatives, like Open Dialogue and Soteria type houses to be given far greater credence, and sufficient funding, in order to be planned & delivered effectively. (No half measures, redistribution of resources from traditional MH services if necessary).
  • We demand the immediate fair redistribution of the country’s wealth, and that all capital for military/nuclear purposes is redirected to progressive User-Led Community/Social Care mental health services.
  • We need a broader range of Survivor narratives to be recognised, honoured, respected and promoted that include an understanding of the difficulties and struggles that people face every day when unable to ‘recover’, not just ‘successful recovery’ type stories.
  • We oppose how ‘Peer Support Workers’ are now expected to have acceptable ‘recovery stories’ that entail gratuitous self-exploration, and versions of ‘successful recovery’ fulfilling expectations, yet no such job requirements are expected of other workers in the mental health sector.
  • We refuse to feel compelled to tell our ‘stories’, in order to be validated, whether as Peer Support Workers, Activists, Campaigners and/or Academics. We believe being made to feel like you have to tell your ‘story’ to justify your experience is a form of disempowerment, under the guise of empowerment.
  • We are opposed to “Recovery Colleges” and their establishment, as a cheap alternative to more effective services. Their course contents fall short of being ‘evidence based’, and fail to lead to academic accreditation, recognised by employers.
  • We believe that there are core principles of ‘recovery’ that are worth saving, and that the colonisation of ‘recovery’ undermines those principles, which have hitherto championed autonomy and self-determination. These principles cannot be found in a one size fits all technique, or calibrated by an outcome measure. We also believe that autonomy and self-determination, as we are social beings, can only be attained through collective struggle rather than through individualistic striving and aspiration.
  • We demand that an independent enquiry is commissioned into the so-called ‘Recovery Model’ and associated ideology that it stems from
  • We call for our fellow mental health Survivors and allies to adopt our principles, and join us in campaigning against this new ‘recovery’ ideology by non-violent protest. We know our views about ‘recovery’ will be controversial, and used by supporters of the ideologies behind ‘recovery’ colonisation to try to divide us. However, we seek to balance the protection of existing services valued by Survivors with agitation for fundamental change.

recovery in the bin.org

Source: 18 Principles

Good Practice Guide for Employing People who Use Drugs

Good practice guide for employing people who use drugs  – An indispensable toolkit (click link)

PWUD (People Who Use Drugs) have insights and expertise that can help inform the planning, delivery and review of harm reduction and HIV services. When we involve PWUD in the design and delivery of services, our work becomes more relevant, targeted and accessible. Working in partnership with PWUD helps our services to reach and connect with other PWUD more effectively, and to understand and meet their needs. A really powerful way of involving PWUD is to employ them as staff.

Employing PWUD sends out a clear message that they are valued partners and are welcome at all levels of service delivery. It also has a very practical set of benefits, helping services to better understand the needs and lived experience of PWUD. PWUD have the right to be employed. Policies that routinely exclude PWUD from the workplace are discriminatory.

When drug use is a problem (and when it is not)

Drug use is complex, and debate on the rights and wrongs of it can become easily polarised. In this context, the medical (disease) model of drug use tends to dominate. This emphasises the problems of dependence as an inevitable consequence of using heroin and other drugs. As a result, the response to drug use is often described as a treatment or cure for a medical illness. The medical model also dominates many 12-step programmes, such as Narcotics Anonymous (NA). It also influences the way many health professionals, academics, politicians and members of the public understand drug use. They share a belief that PWUD quickly lose the ability to control their drug use, and make conscious, autonomous or rational decisions about it. However, the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) acknowledged in the World drug report 2014 that only 10% of PWUD will experience problems arising from their drug use.

This implies that many people’s experience of drug use can be non-problematic and often pleasurable. Similarly, some of our staff will have experiences with drugs that are non-problematic and recreational. Although in the alcohol field the concept of controlled drinking is now widely accepted, for many years the possibility of non-dependent and controlled heroin use has been largely ignored, despite evidence that such patterns exist.

This research demonstrates that some people are able to use heroin in a non-dependent or controlled manner. Studies of people using cocaine have also shown well-established patterns and strategies for self-control. These studies highlight the importance of the social context in which drugs are used and its impact on an individual’s experience of drugs and their effects.

We learn from these studies about the importance of context when trying to understand drug use patterns, and question the value of framing drug use as an individual failing or illness. (text taken from the guide itself. To receive a copy of the guide click the link at the top of this page)

Also read:

International HIV/AIDS Alliance (2010), Good Practice Guide. HIV and drug use: community responses to injecting drug use and HIV. Available at: www.aidsalliance.org/assets/000/000/383/454-G ood-practice-guide-HIV-and-druguse_original.pdf?1405520 726

This guide has been developed by the International HIV/AIDS Alliance (the Alliance) as part of the CAHR project, supported by the Netherlands’ Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The International HIV/AIDS Alliance in Ukraine (Alliance Ukraine) led this work, supported by the programme “Building a sustainable system of comprehensive services on HIV prevention, treatment, care and support for MARPs and PLWH in Ukraine”, funded by the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund).

 

Citric Acid in Heroin: How Much is too Much?

Hi again,

Now many of you will know about this video -and the information that came out a few years back on citric acid and heroin -regarding ‘How Much is Too Much?’. But there are still many people who didnt see it and many people who are still using too much citric acid, not realising that not only are they damaging their veins more, but they are actually damaging / reducing the quality of their heroin! Yes, it is true readers! If you use citric or vit C (which is the same but slightly less acidic thus you need a bit more when mixing up) when mixing up your brown, black or beige heroin (this does not affect white heroin which should dissolve without heat or citric), and you haven’t heard about this issue or seen the video -then you MUST take 10minutes out of your day and listen up!

 

Citric_sachets_small

Order your sterile Citric sachets to your home in discreet wrapping, from Exchange Supplies, the good guys in business http://www.exchangesupplies.org/shop.php

So, this is a really good video from Exchange Supplies, every users favourite organisation and at the forefront of developing really useful user friendly, health and harm reduction information and equipment for the drug using community and needle exhanges and drug services across the UK and worldwide.

They have made numerous videos but this is one of their most popular. It is a clear video shown in under 10 minutes,  that discusses the issue of citric acid (or vitamin C) -the powder many of us have to add to brown heroin in order to ‘break it down’ and make it work as an injectable solution. Now, we don’t of course need to do this with white heroin, but dark beige, brown or black heroin made up for injecting, will need citric acid or vitamin C added to it.

Now ok, we all know that. But what this video (and the research done at Exchange Supplies), they wanted to look into just HOW MUCH citric was enough.

 

It turns out that we all learnt 2 valuable lessons from ES working in the laboratory! Too much citric over the years -will fuck up your veins -and also your heroin – so there are 2 very good reasons to use less citric:

  1. to save your veins over the short and long term

  2.  To avoid destroying or reducing the quality of your heroin from over acidification

For further reading and to see the famous How Much is Too Much, Citic Video, click here.

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