Employing People Who Use Drugs

And why it is a good idea!

Introducing a Good practice guide for employing people who use drugs .

A truly indispensable toolkit.
PWUD (People Who Use Drugs) have insights and expertise that can help inform the planning, delivery, monitoring and review of harm reduction and many other drug related services. When we involve PWUD in the design and delivery of services for our community, the overall work becomes more relevant, targeted and accessible. Working in partnership with PWUD helps services to reach and connect with other PWUD more effectively, and importantly, to understand and meet their needs.

A really powerful way of involving PWUD is to employ them as staff.

EmployingPWUDs_guide1

Employing PWUD sends out a clear message that they are valued partners and are welcome at all levels of service delivery. It also has a very practical set of benefits, helping services to better understand the needs and lived experience of PWUD. PWUD have the right to be employed. Policies that routinely exclude PWUD from the workplace are discriminatory.
This guide has been carefully and thoughtfully written and involved the community of people who use drugs in its design and execution.  It provides really excellent information in the form of a practical toolkit that services themselves can and should use when it comes to considering the employment of PWUD’s in services.

It is true, there are unique issues that PWUDs may bring to the workplace if / when employed. However, the really interesting insights,  ideas, and approaches a service will experience from engaging PWUDs is sure to make the extra effort of learning how to structure the work environment, all the more worthwhile.

This guide also has really well thought out and evidenced based information for ensuring that PWUDs who are engaged as volunteers or mentors in any service, are able to deliver their very best, and are properly supported and compensated by the service they work hard for.

It is essential that people who are still actively using drugs, and those who are relatively stable in treatment  -are recognised as able to make a valuable contribution to the development of our communities drug and alcohol services! It is a field that should not be exclusively for people ‘in recovery’, and as this guide will show, there are many valid reasons why the entire community of people who use drugs all have valuable roles to play in giving us better quality drug and alcohol services.

Here are just some of the topics discussed in this excellent guide. Make sure every drug service is aware of its existence.

2.2. When drug use is a problem (and when it is not)
2.4. Employing ex-drug users and people in recovery
2.4.1. Employing people who are engaged in OST and drug treatment
2.4.2. Employing people who are active drug users
2.4.3. Employing people who are active stimulant users
2.5. The value of staff who use drugs

4.2. Problem drug use and work
4.3. Imposing personal models and philosophies of drug use
4.5. Moving from being a peer to working in a harm reduction organisation
4.6. Inappropriate relationships with clients
4.7. Supplying, or soliciting the supply of, illicit drugs
4.8. When peer support groups become unhealthy
4.9. Managing staff with health conditions that impact on performance
4.10. Managing a death in the workforce or among the client group

Appendix 3: Risk assessment circle
Appendix 5: Examples of job advertisements for staff who use drugs and peer outreach workers
Appendix 6: Model questions for peer interviewers
Appendix 7: Conducting a review meeting
Appendix 8: Developing a self-control programme
Appendix 9: Checklist for managing staff with problem drug use at work
Appendix 10: Training exercises from the Bangkok workshop
Appendix 11: Normal and complex grief reactions

Save yourself a copy and spread it around the staff in the drug services you know -you never know -you might get a job there one day!

NOTE: This guide came out at the end of 2016 and I have written about it before however it was hidden on our website so I thought it should be pulled out again and given a front page showing. I hope you will agree it will be a useful guide for some years to come.

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