Be Wary of the New Stylee Drug Rip Off

Something to spread among our community friends -a new style of rip off affecting drug users on the internet.

If your gonna do it - pass it on in the safest way possible.

If your gonna do it -be careful out there!

The other day while helping out on the Release Drugs Helpline (Release has THE BEST team of assembled minds to solely eat, sleep, think, create and research ‘drug use by the common dude’ -in ALL its incredible shapes and sizes. A knowledge that is only attainable by a  ferocious interest and total  immersion in the ‘Good the Bad and the Ugliest of every corner of the biggest dark room of synthetic and organic drug use and its role in our society today. We can’t advertise about it too much because we don’t have the resources to do the work that we know is out there and will flood our way should people find out we exist.

Anyway, I was answering a call on the helpline, which covers every kind of drug related call from worried mums and partners, to drug tests at work, to bullying or coercion to detox etc, from staff at methadone clinics,  to ‘what drug is this’ to ‘help I think I am in a mess -am I?’ and everything in between, before and after, when I got an interesting call.

For info on the RELEASE Helpline -click here

A very worried guy started telling me this story. He said his boss was a recreational drug user, who was using too much of everything and was spiralling out of control a bit. One night, his boss and a few other workmates were at his house (the phone guy) when the boss says ‘Hey, lets order some drugs on the internet -I know where and what to ask for’.

Everyone was drunk so agreed without thinking too much about it. The boss needed to use his employees computer right there, and his email -and sent off an order using – FIRST WARNING SIGN – a Moneygram money order – for mephedrone. It was to the USA.

48 hours later, the phone guy (the employee) starts getting emails -loads of them -and then phone calls -constantly. The people on the end of the phone said to him “I know what you did -those drugs are illegal. We are in Ghana and our company have intercepted your illegal shipment of drugs -destined for you in the UK. We want you to send $2000 immediately by way of a Moneygram order to a bank account we will name shortly – OR we will contact British Police and tell them everything and send them the drugs for your prosecution.

The poor employee was completely freaking out -his saw his entire ‘straight’ life crumbling around him in a mess of lies and police raids. He had not told his wife and was trying to hide everything. His boss had no real sympathy and told him to ignore it.

Unfortunately, the dude had to hang up fast as his wife came home and he didn’t ring back. However, he did say that the phone calls had stopped during the last 24 hours and so had the emails. So I am hoping things went quiet and the shitfuckers with the rather clever scam, went elsewhere.

In any case, our advice would have been to ignore it completely. A complete chancers scam, one should just call their bluff, maybe get ready with a story to tell your wife or boss if an email goes around from them with your order on it (which is probably not likely -but possible) -and say you were just curious but didn’t do anything -etc. I am sure you could think of something decent to explain your out of character behaviour.

Of course one must be very careful re buying internet drugs – always do your research -always read between the lines re-reviews, only buy via recent recommendation from a previous purchaser. And don’t inject anything you get through the internet re research chemicals. By the look of the very odd occurrences that happen to people who overdose on cathinones, (it looks like no other kind of overdose -and closer to poisonings from chemical gases or nervous system toxicity like chemical weapons exposure etc. Very disturbing so tread super careful with chemistry and what you dont expect… Google ‘frozen addicts’ on our website and see what one small mistake in the lab -one wrong molecule -can create in the average heroin user.

click this link to see it -its unmissable.

 

The State We’re In; Heroin Prescribing in the UK

Here is the unedited version of an article I wrote for the Drug Fields’ trade magazine, DDN (Drink and Drug News), which was published yesterday. The link to DDN website is here, and they publish both free online versions and hard copy mail-outs. It is an excellent way of keeping bang up to date with what is happening in the UK drug treatment system. Here is the link to the article as appeared and the issue of the DDN magazine.

Heroin is provided on prescription in what was known as 'The British System'

Heroin is still (rarely) provided on prescription in what was known as ‘The British System’

 

The average diamorphine prescription: A long way from street smack.

The average diamorphine prescription: A long way from street smack.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The State We’re In

‘The game of history is usually played by the best and the worst over the heads

of the majority in the middle.’ – Eric Hoffer

“I feel like they are waiting for the last handful of us to die off and that will be the end of heroin prescribing in Britain, as we know it”, I said miserably.

Gary turned and looked at me seriously through his spectacles, “If we don’t try and do something now there will be no diamorphine prescribing left anywhere in the UK”.

Gary Sutton (head of the Drug Team at Release)  tapped away on the computer in front of me, putting the last few lines on a letter to yet another treatment service who had been forcibly extracting a long term client off his diamorphine ampoules and onto an oral medication. It was proving to be a painful and destructive decision for the client, who was experiencing a new daily torment as his once stable life began to unravel around him.

The drug team and its helpline (known affectionately as ‘Narco’), all part of the UK charity Release, receives phone calls from people in drug treatment from all over UK. By doing so it serves as the proverbial stethoscope clamped to the arrhythmic heart of our nation’s drug politik and bears a chronological witness to the fallout from Number 10 affecting the individual, on the street and in treatment. In other words we witness the consequences of policy and treatment decisions, and try and support or advocate for the caller.

 

“...But as winter draws the shades on yet another year in

the drugs field, we find we are bearing witness to a tragedy,  

one of small proportions but with huge implications…”

 

But as winter draws the shades on yet another year in the drugs field, we find we are bearing witness to a tragedy, one of small proportions but with huge implications. It involves the last vestiges of the British System of drug treatment, the ‘jewel in its crown’ – heroin prescribing – and the decline of the NHS, under assault from a mercilessly competitive tendering process and the crude procurement that is defining its replacement. Is that where we are really heading?

It may be true to say that to try and define the old ‘British System’ is to trap its wings under a microscope and allow for a possibly contentious dissection; the late ‘Bing’ Spear, formerly Chief Inspector of the Home Office Drugs Branch, might be the first in line by reminding us that the implications of “’system’ and ‘programme’ suggests a coordination, order and an element of (state) planning and direction, all totally alien to the fundamental ethos of the British approach”. His point being that the essence of the ‘British System’ was that it “allows the individual doctor total clinical freedom to decide how to treat an addict patient”.

John Strang and Michael Gossop, in their thoroughly researched double volume book on ‘Heroin Addiction and the British System’, stated in the epilogue of volume 2, that ‘Amongst the (probably unintended) benefits of [this] approach may be the avoidance of the pursuit of extreme solutions and hence an ability to tolerate imperfection, alongside a greater freedom, and hence a particular capacity for evolution.’

 

“…‘Amongst the (probably unintended) benefits of [this] approach

may be the avoidance of the pursuit of extreme solutions

and hence an ability to tolerate imperfection, alongside a greater freedom,

and hence a particular capacity for evolution.’…Strang/Gossop..”

 

The average diamorphine prescription: A long way from street smack.

The average diamorphine prescription: A long way from street smack.

The British ‘Approach’ (arguably are more appropriate phrase) had once allowed for a level of evolution, of experimentation and pharmaceutical flexibility; three characteristics that are glaringly missing from front line drug treatment today. Although we have no room to discuss clinical guidance here, it is often the case that when presenting services with complex individual cases at Release, we are rebuffed by the response ‘it’s not in the guidelines’, ‘it’s not licensed’, or even, as if drug workers are loyal party backbenchers, ’it’s not government policy’!

Hindsight is a gift, and although many of us could while away the hours pontificating about just how and why it all went so publicly wrong for our ‘unhindered prescribers’ back in the day (think Drs Petro, (Lady) Frankau, and a handful of others), that would be to miss the point. The reality is, once we pick up and examine the pieces of the last 100 years, there are shining areas of light in our British Approach. Marked by both a simple humanity and a brilliant audacity, it permitted a private and dignified discussion between both doctor and patient to find the drug that created the preconditions for the ‘patient’ (today the ‘client’) to find the necessary balance in life.

Are we really back to the days of having to ask to be treated as an individual? Policy in treatment is today interfering to such an extent that the formulation that the patient feels works best for them (physeptone tablets, heroin, morphine, oxycodone, DF118’s etc.) may no longer fit into today’s homogenous and fixated theme of methadone or buprenorphine, one part of a backwards step.

Although the days of unhindered diamorphine prescribing are almost gone, thankfully, there is still a small group of well informed and supportive doctors, some of whom hold the rarefied Home Office licence to prescribe diamorphine (to people who are opiate dependent.) Regrettably,  there appear to be a good number of licensees who don’t use their license to treat opiate users at all possibly having never to have had the good fortune to encounter a suitably needy client in their catchment area.  Is it possible that they remain content to absorb the kudos and ‘super specialist status’ that the licence conveys without doing any of the work?

 

Prohibition, fear

“…Prohibition, politics and the soundbite media means we are doomed to discuss [heroin prescribing] under the umbrella of ‘treating the most intractable…”

 Fear and public ignorance has forced us to collapse any new diamorphine prescribing into a tight wad of supervision, medicalisation and regulation while prohibition, politics and the soundbite media has meant that we have been doomed to discuss this subject under the umbrella of ‘treating the most intractable, the most damaged, the treatment failures, the failures of treatment’.

Why must a treatment that has proven to be the optimum for so many, be left until people have been forced to suffer through a series of personal disasters and treatment failures? Did this narrative help to diminish the intervention? One of the benefits of the ‘old style’ of heroin prescribing has been the ability to take it home and use it like one might use insulin, which permits a level of independence central to any functioning life of work and leisure.  This small although hugely significant freedom can still fit comfortably as part of a transitional route for people progressing through more heavily supervised heroin programmes towards less supervision and as such needs to be retained, and even embraced.

The last few dozen people left on take home diamorphine prescriptions in the UK today, seem to be stable, functioning, often working people who no longer have so much as a ‘drug problem’ but a manageable drug dependence. This last group of diamorphine clients are remnants of the old system with, it appears, no new people taking their places once they leave. Today these are some of the very people who are now ringing the Release helpline to try and save their prescriptions altogether. They are frightened, most of them are in their fifties and having qualified for diamorphine many years ago because ‘nothing else worked’, what now are they to do?

 

In Switzerland, diamorphine prescribing has been so successful; they even have two programmes in prisons. (Now there is a ‘Sun’ headline, if I’ve ever seen one!). Clients in their community programmes pay around 45 Euros (£32) a month for their ‘scripts, something most British heroin users/OST clients would probably agree to in an instant if it meant diamorphine was offered.

In Britain, diamorphine prescribing has been ensconced in a political and clinical debate about the expense and fears of an imaginary tsunami of diversion. Yet what of today’s financial wastage? We have ways to deal with diversion, yet poor and frequent commissioning has a number of serious consequences, including a lack of continuity of care, a slide back to postcode variance, and not least, cost. An exercise to quantify the costs of tendering services over 10 years ago came up with a figure of £300,000 as the sum expended by all bidders and the commissioner, per tender. Money that could be better spent, surely?

A few weeks ago the LSE put on a mini-symposium on diamorphine with a panel of international clinicians, academics and research experts. Everyone present agreed that prescribing diamorphine, albeit in a very controlled supervised manner, had tremendous merit. Taking the idea from the success in Britain (e.g. Dr John Marks), today we see a method that has evolved across Europe; the Swiss, the Dutch, the Germans and the Danes, amongst others, are all doing it, treating thousands of clients, with great results. So it was more than frustrating to hear that our own diamorphine clinical trials had been closed this year with no plans to re-start them

 

“…Diamorphine should not end up marginalised and discarded because a

controversial new ‘system’ finds it far harder to tolerate than the patients

who receive it do…”

 

Diamorphine should not end up marginalised and discarded because a controversial new ‘system’ finds it far harder to tolerate than the patients who receive it do. The benefit is proven. It’s not a choice between maintenance and abstinence, addiction is not reductive to either/or and as treatment is neither just a science nor an art, and our clinicians should not be restricted to methadone or Subutex, or our clients subjected to a binary ‘take it or leave it’ choice in services.

by Erin O’Mara with massive thanks to Release and its intrepid Drug Team: published in Dec 2015 issue of Drink and Drug News

The Incidious Spread of Big Pharma

Hi guys, now you know we are always the first to understand that things are complicated and never just black and white and that a junkies relationship with their doctor/s is something pretty unique (we could all write a book right?) and we are not saying we want all prescribing doctors arrested – that is not the point here, and its a very long way from it.

But just like when you scratch at the ugly scab that is the war on drugs and you find governments’ lying, scheming for their own economic ends, even wheeling and dealing in the very drugs they lock thousands of their citizens up for..and you scratch deeper still and you see the roots of these global drug laws rooted in fear and racism, xenophobia and cultural ignorance, economies and GDP’s, total monopolies by companies and the ever larger monolithic pharmaceutical industrys’ that orchestrate and lobby for the very laws they securely tie up ever tighter still, seeking global domination and a pill for everything we could never even imagine we needed one for….- there is certainly no concern for our youth or environment,  – …..Well, I thought you might like to read this article that gives some background into the explosion in Oxycontin in the USA today. How big pharma is raking it in, how the doctors are earning billions as well, how USA overdose rates continue to rise and rise year on year, how prisons keep increasing their numbers of paid lobbyists at Capitol Hill to make sure that, although violent crime is, and has gone down (yes that’s right) in the USA for many years now, more and more laws keep getting introduced to ensnare the illegal immigrant, the petty criminal etc, so society can pay for these ‘Titan prisons’ and maintain the jobs within them, in the cities that the bureaucrats would flourish because of these disgusting, concrete jungles of inhumanity..

But let’s just get a glimpse of how big pharma do things – or rather – how little pharma can grow into HUGE pharma, courtesy of the American taxpayer, and another drug dependent generation – paying the ‘Right Man’ this time, not the junkie down the street….

 PS – Remember, we don’t always dig the journo’s language when describing people who use drugs, but we will overlook that somewhat for the sake of the piece. Always write in to the editor to challenge their language if you see or feel that oit is inaccurate, sweeping, or causes offence.

Poison Pill:  How the American opiate

epidemic was started by one

pharmaceutical company 

Written by MIKE MARIANI FEB 23, 2015

(The link to complete article above and at the end of this text – thanks in advance to Mike Mariani – Here is an extract)

PURDUE_oxyThe state of Kentucky may finally get its deliverance. After more than seven years of battling the evasive legal tactics of Purdue Pharma, 2015 may be the year that Kentucky and its attorney general, Jack Conway, are able to move forward with a civil lawsuit alleging that the drug maker misled doctors and patients about their blockbuster pain pill OxyContin, leading to a vicious addiction epidemic across large swaths of the state.

A pernicious distinction of the first decade of the 21st century was the rise in painkiller abuse, which ultimately led to a catastrophic increase in addicts, fatal overdoses, and blighted communities. But the story of the painkiller epidemic can really be reduced to the story of one powerful, highly addictive drug and its small but ruthlessly enterprising manufacturer.

On December 12, 1995, the Food and Drug Administration approved the opioid analgesic OxyContin. It hit the market in 1996. In its first year, OxyContin accounted for $45 million in sales for its manufacturer, Stamford, Connecticut-based pharmaceutical company Purdue Pharma. By 2000 that number would balloon to $1.1 billion, an increase of well over 2,000 percent in a span of just four years. Ten years later, the profits would inflate still further, to $3.1 billion. By then the potent opioid accounted for about 30 percent of the painkiller market. What’s more, Purdue Pharma’s patent for the original OxyContin formula didn’t expire until 2013. This meant that a single private, family owned pharmaceutical company with non-descript headquarters in the Northeast controlled nearly a third of the entire United States market for pain pills.

OxyContin’s ball-of-lightning emergence in the health care marketplace was close to unprecedented for a new painkiller in an age where synthetic opiates like Vicodin, Percocet, and Fentanyl had already been competing for decades in doctors’ offices and pharmacies for their piece of the market share of pain-relieving drugs. In retrospect, it almost didn’t make sense. Why was OxyContin so much more popular? Had it been approved for a wider range of ailments than its opioid cousins? Did doctors prefer prescribing it to their patients?

Because there was simply so much OxyContin available for over a decade, it trickled down from pharmacies and hospitals and became a street drug, coveted by teens and fiends and sold by dealers at a premium

_oxycontin_600During its rise in popularity, there was a suspicious undercurrent to the drug’s spectrum of approved uses and Purdue Pharma’s relationship to the physicians that were suddenly privileging OxyContin over other meds to combat everything from back pain to arthritis to post-operative discomfort. It would take years to discover that there was much more to the story than the benign introduction of a new, highly effective painkiller.

In 1952, brothers Arthur, Raymond, and Mortimer Sackler purchased Purdue Pharma, then called Purdue Frederick Co. All three men were psychiatrists by trade, working at a mental facility in Queens in the 1940s.

The eldest brother, Arthur, was a brilliant polymath, contributing not only to psychiatric research but also thriving in the fledgling field of pharmaceutical advertising. It was here that he would leave his greatest mark. As a member of William Douglas McAdams, a small New York-based advertising firm, Sackler expanded the possibilities of medical advertising by promoting products in medical journals and experimenting with television and radio marketing. Perhaps his greatest achievement, detailed in his biography in the Medical Advertising Hall of Fame, was finding enough different uses for Valium to turn it into the first drug to hit $100 million in revenue.

The Medical Advertising Hall of Fame website’s euphemistic argot for this accomplishment states that Sackler’s experience in the fields of psychiatry and experimental medicine “enabled him to position different indications for Roche’s Librium and Valium.”

Sackler was also among the first medical advertisers to foster relationships with doctors in the hopes of earning extra points for his company’s drugs, according to a 2011 exposé in Fortune. Such backscratching in the hopes of reciprocity is now the model for the whole drug marketing industry. Arthur Sackler’s pioneering methods would be cultivated by his younger brothers Raymond and Mortimer in the decades to come, as they grew their small pharmaceutical firm.

oxycodone-oxycontinStarting in 1996, Purdue Pharma expanded its sales department to coincide with the debut of its new drug. According to an article published in The American Journal of Public Health, “The Promotion and Marketing of OxyContin: Commercial Triumph, Public Health Tragedy,” Purdue increased its number of sales representatives from 318 in 1996 to 671 in 2000. By 2001, when OxyContin was hitting its stride, these sales reps received annual bonuses averaging over $70,000, with some bonuses nearing a quarter of a million dollars. In that year Purdue Pharma spent $200 million marketing its golden goose. Pouring money into marketing is not uncommon for Big Pharma, but proportionate to the size of the company, Purdue’s OxyContin push was substantial.

Boots on the ground was not the only stratagem employed by Purdue to increase sales for OxyContin. Long before the rise of big data, Purdue was compiling profiles of doctors and their prescribing habits into databases. These databases then organized the information based on location to indicate the spectrum of prescribing patterns in a given state or county. The idea was to pinpoint the doctors prescribing the most pain medication and target them for the company’s marketing onslaught.

That the databases couldn’t distinguish between doctors who were prescribing more pain meds because they were seeing more patients with chronic pain or were simply looser with their signatures didn’t matter to Purdue. The Los Angeles Times reported that by 2002 Purdue Pharma had identified hundreds of doctors who were prescribing OxyContin recklessly, yet they did little about it. The same article notes that it wasn’t until June of 2013, at a drug dependency conference in San Diego, that the database was ever even discussed in public.

Purdue's Oxycontin - reformulated: Pic - Oxy's crushed by a mortar and pestle: reformulated to deter injecting...

purdue_reformulated_oxy_Pic – crushed by a mortar n pestle: reformulated to deter injecting…

Combining the physician database with its expanded marketing, it would become one of Purdue’s preeminent missions to make primary care doctors less judicious when it came to handing out OxyContin prescriptions.

Beginning around 1980, one of the more significant trends in pain pharmacology was the increased use of opioids for chronic non-cancer pain. Like other pharmaceutical companies, Purdue likely sought to capitalize on the abundant financial opportunities of this trend. The logic was simple: While the number of cancer patients was not likely to increase drastically from one year to the next, if a company could expand the indications for use of a particular drug, then it could boost sales exponentially without any real change in the country’s health demography.

Read the rest of the fascinating article here – Poison Pill:  How the American opiate epidemic was started by one pharmaceutical companyMIKE MARIANI FEB 23, 2015

(more…)

What Will the Future Look Like for Drug Users?

Wow, great question huh? And one that Max Daly from VICE Magazine has just answered in its January 13th Edition.  I was really pleased to see an articulation of how I have been feeling about set ups like Silk Road and the Dark Web as well as the hype around NPS’s – New Psychoactive Substances, or research chemicals to you and me.

colouredbrain

I couldn’t help shake the feeling that many of these new research chemicals sound like (and feel like) a bad day in your drugged out teenage bedroom. Chemicals that are – well, just too chemically, with spiky, wired kind of edges, insomnia rather than stimulation, and a strange collection of side effects like twitches, memory loss, anxiety  or nausea or even seizures, arrhythmias, panic attacks and collapsing/black outs. You’re sensing the picture. You’ve probably had experience of the ‘almost’ drugs; ephedrine trying to be amphetamine,  (no good) pheniramine trying to pose as LSD (a trip for sure but…) The old school big sellers are out there as big sellers for a reason.They have risen above the throng.  Surely we would know by now if these new drugs were consistently more like diamonds than mud to experience? But I fear we do know, for the most part. Most of the newbies, 98% of them, aren’t really very pleasant. Now of course there has been fatalities, but what do we expect when we really dont know shit about where these chemicals are coming from, the lab conditions, the chemists making it up, let alone whats REALLY in a particular substance.

15 minutes of Fame, NPS Style

A look on YouTube into NPS /research chemicals/bath salts and overdoses, and you get our wonderful society out there filming their buddy’s or a strangers weird drug overdose. This was when I saw some very disturbing but similar overdose reactions of a type Id never seen before from any other drug. These weren’t seizures of any kind currently understood, they were some kind of altered state where the person (and their were many sharing the same kind of symptoms) was unable to master any lower limb movements -in other words their arms and legs were completely all over the place and they were often unable to walk at all. Not only that, but movement came from a kind of seal like or fish like, flapping, rolling, careering along the pavement. Vocal sounds became an awful guttural kind of noise or a choked up screaming. apparently something does actually happen to the vocal chords so the person cannot use it for normal communication. There has also been videos of police getting out taser and repeatedly, and I mean REPEATEDLY, tasering a person 2,3,4 even 5 times and the person is still able to excitedly respond or get up and still freak out etc. Body temperature supposedly heats up so clothes come off, which again gets all the home grown film makers out, filming another persons terrifying psychosis of some sort for all their workmates and neighbours to see.

 (Note: This is a very disturbing video (think Ill remove it afterwards) of what appears to be the kind of ‘bathsalts’ type of overdose -NOT Krokodil as the heading describes. There are many of chemicals possibly derived from the cathinones that seem to be responsible for some of these responses, in particular MDVP which may be the culprit. People often use way over the tiny dose that is advised of 5-10mg. There are quite a lot of youtube videos like this where people are having some kind of episode but all show strikingly similar side effects, side effects that I for one, in over 30 years on the scene, have never seen before. It isn’t to be hyped, but there is something weird and a bit scary about the effects of some of these unknown new chemicals) .

Click to KFX.org.uk, a really comprehensive website on all drugs but esp NPS, updated regularly.

Click to KFX.org.uk, a really comprehensive website on all drugs but esp NPS, updated regularly.

So yeah, its scary but, to go back to the future of drugs and the Vice article, it was good to hear someone agreeing that the NPS’s wont really take off, that they will remain a teenagers fallback, or for the person that has not yet properly developed real drug taste. That only the good old troopers will remain the most used and the quality will; just get better as more and more people use the Dark Web and networks like Silk Road 3, to really flesh out a safe place to buy quality drugs and, yes ok,  hellishly over inflated prices. But, if your anything like me and, dare I say, a drug connoisseur, you will be happy to pay an inflated fee if the drugs are going to be exactamundo – quality high, packaging clever, weight bang on. Here is a quote from the article:

” Yet the future will not be about the endless procession of legal highs. A smattering of new psychoactive substances (or NPS) will always be around, and to an extent always have been, but they have had their day in the sun. An interesting sideshow, they have served a purpose. Yes,mephedrone is here to stay and maybe 2C-B will hang around too, but now that the ecstasy and cocaine markets have righted themselves, with the purity of both drugs up considerably, the old school drugs are back. Clones of stimulants and other chemicals will still have an appeal to those who are skint, or are unable to get hold of decent drugs or who want to avoid getting caught out in piss tests, but the imminent clampdown on head shops will stifle supply to teenagers and the homeless – two of the keenest buyers of NPS products.

The online drug trade, however, will be blazing a trail into the next decade and beyond, whether the world’s police like it or not.”

Finally a Market to Dream About?

The Future of Drugs: Vice Magazine Issue 531: Written by Max Daly

The Future of Drugs: Vice Magazine Issue 531: Written by Max Daly

Max Daly then relays his meeting with Mike Power, author of what looks to be a great read, called Drugs 2.0: The Web Revolution That’s Changing How the World Gets High. Max asks him about how the online drug trade might fare over the next decade or two. “At the moment, the online trade in drugs is a minority sport, a good way of buying high quality drugs,” he told me. “Even now it’s tipping over from early adopters into the mainstream. It will get bigger, easier to use and more widespread. There will be more sites and more people using them because it is the perfect business model: anonymous, commission-based, peer-reviewed, postal drug dealing. Online dealing is not a replacement for trafficking cartels, it’s never going to work on that level, but if you’ve got a kilo of MDMA it’s the way to go.”  

I would actually add to that, having just a bit of this and that, it can still be a way to go. Sharing in a solid community where a forum is tightly connected to the site itself, so people regularly post about who they bought off and what it was like, along with who to avoid like the plague, all overseen by the sites moderator ensuring there is no bullshit being allowed to fester or take off, its really effective. It has a terrific potential for the future to be a real by the people for the people, kind of drug market, one where quality triumphs! What, what, no I’m not dreaming! This could slowly start to formulate around us. Oh sure I think people will continue to invent chemicals to take, although it does seem like they’ve already exhausted the best feeling drugs from a few main families of drugs: cathinones / phenethylamines, and amphetamines and are already on the dregs of these. Surely there has to be another surprise like a synthetic ‘opioid’ family to discover??

In the meantime, it could well be as VICE, and Max state. That NPS’s will die a slow death or remain in relatively low numbers as adults go old school and teens grow out of it, and bans catch up and overdoses get publicised. Mephedrone and a few relatives are here to stay of course, and although I think Spice and the synthetic cannabinoids are a bit creepy, even scary, that will always attract some who think it’s a cheap and easy cannabis alternative (just buy real pot and avoid the brain damage!).

goodies to buy. But there are no new vendors on SR2 these days, only old vendors from Silk Road are permitted to sell these days, seems it is safer that way...

All those goodies to buy! The old silk road online shop. It seems the FBI busts only served to force the dodgier online set ups out of business and tightened up safety protocols for the remainders.

I saw the wonderful JP Grund so a recent presentation on NPS’s at a conference in Amsterdam and he talked about the 3 D printer and that we will, one day in the near future, have drug recipes that are made for our genetic makeup and they will be sent to you with the computer programme and I presume the associated chemicals, that you administer to your 3D printer and it makes you your own, personal drug of choice. Now how nice could that be friends?

Read the full Vice article here (more…)

Charlotte Walsh – Untapped Possibilities of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971

Photo of the psychedelic drug 2C-C on blotting...

Blotting paper tabs of psychedelics (God, where do you get those these days??!)

A really interesting presentation on the untapped possibilities of using the misuse of drugs act 1971., focussing on the story of Casey Cardison, arrested for the production of psychedelic drugs in his home laboratory. In court, Casey stood up for ‘cognative liberty’ the right to alter ones mental functioning as one see fit – and tried to to hang a human rights based argument on this, based around Article 9 of the Human rights act which protects freedom of thought. Although the Judge would refuse to allow him to mount this type of defense, Casey proceeded to focus on what it means to be truely free in our society. And Although Casey received 20 years, he pursued his right to appeal framing a really interesting defence. However, his appeal was denied but he continued to delve then into the Misuse of Drugs Act’s ‘incorrect interpretation’ to fight for further justice.. Charlotte Walsh goes on to state that the home secretary‘s role continually misinterprets the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971. She asks ‘Does the act Mandate prohibition? Or is the home secretary confusing control with prohibition? She believes so, citing the recent reclassifications of the harms drugs cause ( a paper in the Lancet by Professor Nutt and colleagues) which put alcohol and tobacco at the top of the list of harms caused by drugs used in society today..In this case, Alcohol and tobacco could be brought under the control of the misuse of drugs act, indeed it is within its jurisdiction. If so, Charlotte tells us that the Misuse of Drugs Act could act to regulate and control these substances, giving us real hope that regulation of less harmful drugs (as Professor Nutts reclassification states) is the next obvious move, and could be made possible by joining together to call for the correct interpretation of the Act -(in particular section 7, 22 and 31)which in effect allows the public to get an accurate idea of the harms caused by drugs, alcohol and tobacco whilst allowing for their continued use. If alcohol and tobacco were brought under the acts and subsequently ‘regulated’ then it would pave the way for other, less harmful drugs to be regulated also. A fascinating discussion and legal argument on the need for a closer look into what we have got as part of our legal system that could create adequate reform rather than wasting additional energy reinventing, or indeed hoping society will accept, a new regulatory system. Well worth a watch!
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Update on the banning of foreigners from Netherlands Coffee Shops

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Many of us have been listening with trepidation as our favourite pot smoking friends on the continent -the Dutch – the ones who gave us sanctuary in the form of a safe place to buy dope when abroad, and a friendly environment to smoke it in, without the fear of getting busted, deported, imprisoned or ripped off are now slowly being forced to close their doors to us. Yes, that’s right- the foreigners who have appreciated being able to sample a well produced product, toked, eaten or vapourised in a chilled out, social environment – have always been grateful for the civilised and pragmatic way the Dutch have shared with us their wares. A welcome relief from the persecution and harassment many of us experience at home around ‘soft’ (and ‘hard’) drug use.

It never ceased to amaze me when visiting Holland that it was always the milder varieties of dope that were the biggest sellers to the Dutch people, they just didnt feel like they had to get smashed at every opportunity. They knew where the dope was, it wasn’t going anywhere, they could get the stronger stuff any time they wanted it in fact, which it turned out, was not that often.

A giggly smoke, some great conversation, a serious munch out on the way home and voila, gone is the image we have in the UK of smoking skunk that  always too strong, sitting catatonic in front of the TV, curtains drawn, paranoia setting in indoors coz its illegal to go outside and just be social with a spliff…

However, due to surrounding countries still not budging with their own punitive cannabis laws, it is inevitable that many of us in neighbouring countries – or as far afield as Australia and the US, feel compelled at times to skippity hop across the border to stock up on some of the good stuff, in a relaxed and hassle free exchange. But those who’ve been keeping an eye on the Dutch developments around both the shrinking the availability of Coffee Shops, as well as the drive to freeze out the pot smoking foreigner, will know that the first door, in the first city of Maastricht, has been firmly slammed shut.

The city of Maastricht, which is about 130 miles south of Amsterdam (towards the German border) is the first place – (though unlikely to be the last) which has just begun to expell what it sees as the boisterous drug tourists who clog up the streets,  engage in street dealing and petty crime, and regularly cause traffic jams. Determined to prevent them from accessing Maastricht’s coffee shops, hi-tech security scanners have been set up to check passports and ID cards, and police will carry out random checks.

In an effort to bring the coffee shop owners themselves on board with the governments cunning plan, only the Dutch, the Belgians and Germans will be permitted to cross the smokey threshold due to the fact that they make up the largest part of the 6000 customers who  pop in to light up every day.  The irony here is of course that if the vast majority of the 6000 smoking tourists visiting coffee shops in the Netherlands are indeed German and Belgian, how will this go any way to reduce the numbers of ‘drug tourists’ clogging up their streets? There is always more to these drug stories dear readers, so do check back to our earlier story on the Netherlands Coffee Shop ban to uncover a little more about the politics behind it.

However, what can be more easily deduced from this sinister exercise is that blackmarket sales of hash and grass will certainly increase, sold to the illegal alien up a back alley all because his passport won’t allow him to enter the smokey but safe environment of a Maastricht Coffee Shop. Let’s hope our British, Spanish or French friend doesn’t get ripped off, end up in a scuffle or get arrested – after all the cultivation and sale of ‘soft’ drugs is decriminalised – but not legal so one might well stilll end up in the boob.

With over 700 coffee shops across The Netherlands, correspondents say the Dutch justice ministry wants them to operate like members’ only clubs, serving only local residents. Yet despite  previous difficulties when trying to enshrine such an exclusive ban in law, The European Court of Justice ruled last December that Dutch authorities could indeed bar foreigners from cannabis-selling coffee shops on the grounds that they were combating drug tourism.

Check out the video above – it’s the lead story -and follow the link to NORMLs website, which is full of video debates, vox pops and discussions on the world of cannabis.

 

Related articles

UK poppy-growing program kept hush-hush — RT

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While Afghanistan burns,  a Pharmaceutical company in Britain clean up.
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Yes readers, you heard it right. Years of burning, spraying and killing off Afghani poppy fields, the Brits have noticed a worrying shortfall in drugs for the global pain killing market. Taking advantage of the recent weather, pharmaceutical company McFarlane Smith has forbidden its poppy farmers to talk to the press, and readers, the Home Office won’t comment either. However it does appear that the crops are located in the rolling plains of Oxfordshire so any news of tanned knobbly balls on sticks about 3 feet high and blowin’ in the wind, Black Poppy will be duty bound to investigate…

(This report is by RT, follow link for video report)

The “War on Drugs” that came soon after the “War on Terror” is being decisively lost. Ten years after the US invasion Afghanistan remains the world’s biggest opium poppy producer. Meanwhile, the UK is making inroads to the market.

As the West struggles to destroy drug production in Afghanistan, Britain harvests a new crop of poppies to plug a growing painkiller shortage. Some believe that is counterproductive.

Just Killing the Pain

In the rolling fields of Oxfordshire, UK, at this time of year, you will probably see wheat or barley ripening for the harvest. But dry springs and warm summers have enabled local farmers to plant a very different type of crop – opium poppies

They are under contract to a pharmaceutical company that turns the opium into morphine and codeine in order to plug a shortfall in strong painkillers in the National Health Service.

In fact, there is a global shortage of drugs made from poppies.The opium grown in Britain will be put to good use, but thousands of miles away, NATO troops are wiping out existing Afghan poppies with bombing, burning and spraying.

“The main question is why are we destroying the Afghan crop and then having to grown poppies in fields in Oxfordshire? It’s been used by the American and British governments repeatedly, one of the so called soft arguments that they put, one of the liberal arguments that they put, is that they’re fighting a war on drugs. This is complete hypocrisy, it’s not true, it’s not what the war is about, and we should own up to that,” says Lindsey German from the Stop the War Coalition.

 Everyone Pays (except McFarlane Smith)

It is easy to understand why Afghan farmers grow, then sell opium to the Taliban. There’s an effective distribution network, and they can make around 17 times more profit per hectare than they can on wheat. Despite the obvious economics, farmers are still being encouraged to grow other crops.

British MP Frank Field thinks that policy has failed, but the Americans will not budge.

“America rules and we follow on behind them. It makes a nonsense of what this relationship is about, when you’re putting British lives at stake, not to be able to use this as a bargaining position with the Americans, to rethink a strategy which I think most people think over the years has failed, historically, has failed, why don’t we try a new tack?”

A Solution to Simple?

Frank Field and his group Poppy Relief believe that Afghan opium should be legalized instead. It would benefit Afghan farmers, raise much-needed revenue for the government’s nation building efforts, and stop the opium from falling into the hands of the drug cartels. Field also says it should be military strategy too.

“In Afghanistan we have chosen bombs, rather than brains. Anybody who would be thinking about how do we get ordinary people, ordinary farmers who see poppies as a cash crop, how do we get them to protect the backs of our troops, we would be thinking about how do we harness this crop, how do we pay them for it and how do we then use that crop to transfer it into medicines to counter pain.”

With opium being burned in Afghanistan and kept a secret in Britain, no-one wants to talk about the UK’s opium-growing program.

RT asked both the farmers and MacFarlane Smith, the company they grow for, if they would give an interview.

MacFarlane Smith said they would not allow the farmers to talk because it is a part of their contract with the Home Office that they keep the poppy growing secretive.

The Home Office also declined to comment.

While poppies are increasingly harvested in Britain, the so-called war on drugs is being decisively lost. The UN says opium production in Afghanistan has been on the rise since the US occupation began in 2001.

Naltrexone

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There's been a lot of 'cures' advertised over the years...

(Updated in 2011 from an article in BP issue 2)

There has been quite a lot of developments in the uses for naltrexone, not just in the UK but around the world -and it is clearly not just a single treatment option. There are various ways of using naltrexone – and this update, taken from issue 2 and added too, looks at Naltrexone’s origins, its uses and its future.

What is Naltrexone and How Does it Work?

For heroin, (and other opiates such as methadone, morphine, palfium, codeine etc), to produce their effects – and get you stoned – they need to be able to attach themselves to small areas in the brain and nervous system called receptor sites. Naltrexone not only blocks these receptor sites, which prevents any opiates from working, but also displaces or removes any existing opiates that currently occupy those sites. Such drugs are called ‘opiate antagonists’ – they antagonise (to put it mildly!) any opiate. This means that if you take naltrexone when you have an opiate ‘habit’, you will find yourself withdrawing quickly and intensely as the opiates are rapidly (rather than slowly) removed from your receptor sites, and your body reacts to their absence. However, if you’ve already detoxed, taking naltrexone may help keep you abstinent as using heroin simply will not work. Naltrexone is sometimes referred to as a ‘non-drug’ because it doesn’t really have any effect other than blocking the effects of opiates. Naltrexone is long lasting – from 24 to 72 hours depending on the dose, and it comes as a tablet, or as an implant. It is closely related- but not the same – as Naloxone (or Narcan), the ‘pure’ opiate antagonist which doctors use for opiate overdoses; but naloxone only works when injected and lasts for only a short time – less than an hour, which is why people need to be monitored and can ‘fall back’ into overdose.

To read the rest of what is an interesting insight into Naltrexone, click here.

Methamphetamine

Crystal methamphetamine

A nice pic of crystal meth!

Methamphetamine

From BP issue 11. Written by M.M (additional text and research E O’Mara)

Recently making a re-appearance in the UK, methamphetamine is starting to make itself known. BP investigates the drug – its effects – and the hype that surrounds its use.

If you were a heroin addict in London during 1967/68 it was likely you were either a doctor or someone in the medical profession with easy access to prescription drugs. Or, you were one of the small clique of several hundred addicts who frequented the West End, many being prescribed ‘jacks’ (diamorphine in soluble pill form), cocaine and a plethora of drugs we might only dream about today (e.g Mandrax, Drinamyl, Seconal, Dexedrine etc). These drugs were prescribed to users by a handful of well meaning, sympathetic -although some might say misguided, doctors, many of whom were based in the West End. One such doctor, now mythologized in British drug culture was Dr. John Petro. Dr Petro was the first G.P to switch his clients from cocaine to Methedrine, (the brand name for methamphetamine) as a result of a clinical preference for the latter. His colleague, Dr Christopher Swann, also switched his cocaine using patients to Methedrine, but for very different reasons. The rules governing the dispensing of cocaine to addicts were, during the late 1960′s, being tightened and this was to affect the way other doctors would prescribe at the time.

There is little doubt that some of those who were switched to Methedrine were drastically over prescribed with some patients receiving as many as 20 to 50, 25mg ampoules per day (1/2g -1 gram). It’s not hard to foresee that the massive over prescribing of amphetamines would cause problems within the drug using community and in retrospect, one can only stagger back in disbelief at the naivete or inexperience of the few doctors involved in this practice. One must remember however, that the treatment of ’addicts’ was still in its infancy and a good deal less was known about methamphetamine, which of course was liberally used by medical students under the recommendation of doctors – as they crammed for exams while working extremely long hours.

The ramifications of the sudden introduction of Methedrine ampoules were twofold. One consequence of the availability of injectable speed was that it caused a significant number of current ‘pill taking’ amphetamine users to begin injecting Methedrine ampoules, the injecting of which didn’t have the same connotations as injecting heroin. Once familiar with a needle and the injecting process, barriers to trying other drugs IV were effectively overcome, making methedrine a more realistic ‘gateway’ drug than the contentions around cannabis. While many of these IV speed users soon came to rely on barbiturates in order to come down after a binge on Methedrine, it was soon discovered that barbs could also be injected although this was a far more dangerous practice and overdose became endemic amongst the drug using population of the time, particularly in the West End. Many users were known on a first name basis by the doctors in the A&E department at Charing Cross hospital, sometimes presenting as many as 2 to 3 times a day. Barbiturates on the whole, were not made for injection and caused horrific abscesses known amongst users as ‘barb burns’.

In Soho and the West End a new ‘type of addict’ started to emerge who had never taken heroin but were experiencing very real problems with Methedrine and barbiturate dependence. The physical health of London’s users deteriorated rapidly coinciding with the increase of methamphetamine and barbiturate prescribing and the subsequent leakage onto the black market. These new drug users were more visible and a good deal harder to treat than their heroin/cocaine predecessors. Methedrine when taken in large doses and administered frequently, does little to improve the mental health of users and when combined with the disinhibiting effects of barbs, many of these patients became unruly and occasionally violent, suffering from varying degrees of drug induced psychosis. In 1968 pharmacists themselves voluntarily agreed to desist in the practice of dispensing Methedrine ampoules.

That was then, the first time that methamphetamine had darkened the doorstep of our green and pleasant land to any significant degree. It seems likely however, that it won’t be the last as anyone with their ear to the ground will no doubt be aware. Methamphetamine has reemerged, but this time entirely through the black market…In simple terms, methamphetamine is the granddaddy of the amphetamine family, being twice as strong as dextroamphetamine (e.g dexedrine), and four times the strength of ordinary amphetamine i.e Benzedrine.

If you would like to read the rest of this terrific article, click here.

Methadone – The History of Juice

Chemical structure of methadone.

Methadone's chemical structure

The Methadone Myths…

Methadone was first synthesised in Germany in 1938 by chemists working for IG Farbenindustrie. There are several widely-circulated stories about the birth of methadone which are of doubtful veracity. It is often said, for example, that the new pharmaceutical was dubbed Dolophine in honour of Adolf Hitler. In fact, it was originally tagged with the unimaginative name of Hochst-10820 (Hochst being the name of the factory where it was invented), and later named Palamidon. Another widely-circulated story has it that the chemical was synthesised for use as an analgesic, eliminating Nazi Germany’s dependence on Turkish opium for morphine, or that it was created on the personal orders of Reich Marshal and Luftwaffe commander Hermann Goering, a heroin addict, to ensure that cold turkey could be kept at bay if supplies of morphine were cut off. Attractive as this last story is, and while it is true that Goering was a junkie, it is probably apocryphal.

Methadone was not brought into wide production during the war at all, and its properties were only studied later. After the war the Hochst factory fell into American hands and as a part of the wholesale plundering of German scientific and technical knowledge (which saw V2 rocket technology and Nazi advanced weapons and intelligence expertise appropriated by the US military-scientific establishment under Operation Paperclip) the methadone molecule too, ended up as loot of war.

More Than Morphine?

It was the American pharmaceutical company Eli-Lilly who began the first clinical trials in 1947 and it was here that it was first christened Dolophine, probably derived from “douleur” and “fin”, the French words for, respectively, “pain” and “end”. The chemical was found to have a similar pharmacological action to morphine, despite its very different chemical structure, and it was much longer-acting. Once these facts were established, methadone disappeared into obscurity in the USA for over a decade. While its chemical cousin pethidine – which, incidentally, was produced in bulk in Nazi Germany as a morphine substitute -and is still used today to ease women’s labour pains, methadone never really caught on as a narcotic analgesic in America.

The earliest accounts of methadone use in the UK are from 1947, when a paper published in the medical journal Lancet described it as “at least as powerful as morphine, and ten times more powerful than pethidine”.

Methadone Treatment

By the end of 1968, the year when the Home Office notification/registration system of addicts was introduced, 297 people had been notified as being addicted to methadone. Doctors who thought it less addictive than other opiates had begun prescribing them the drug however, through the 1960s, patterns of drug use were changing; Opiate addiction, which had until then, primarily been an indulgence of the wealthy (or medical professionals themselves), was now being picked up by younger people, taking opiates for pleasure rather than for pain.

1968 also saw the introduction of drug treatment clinics and the abolition of free prescribing. The clinic system effectively removed the GP’s discretion in the prescribing of controlled drugs and specialist centres took over the treatment of the majority of dependent drug users, a practice that continues today. In the first years of the clinics, doctors freely prescribed pure pharmaceutical heroin and methadone in injectable form for addicts. The introduction in the mid 70s of smokable Middle Eastern brown heroin resulted in many users arriving for treatment not expecting to inject their drugs, encouraging the clinics to move towards using oral methadone for treatment.

Methadone Maintenance – The Minimum Vs the Maximum

Methadone maintenance treatment, as we recognise it now, was pioneered in the USA in the early 60s. In 1963, two New York doctors by the names of Marie Nyswander and Vincent Dole began exploring methadone as a possible treatment for opiate addiction. There was a screaming need for it – by the end of the decade, heroin-related mortality had become the leading cause of death in New York for young adults aged between 15 and 35. Dole and Nyswander identified the features of methadone that made it a suitable maintenance drug. At doses beginning at 80mg per day, it effectively blocks the euphoric effects of all opiate drugs. Patients stabilised on methadone do not experience euphoric effects and tolerance does not develop like many other opiates, necessitating ever-increasing doses. Tolerance to methadone’s pain-killing effects does develop however, meaning patients experience pain normally although trying to explain this to a nurse or doctor when you’re in A & E is another matter entirely. As it is a long-acting drug, it can be administered once a day, enabling a greater level of stabilisation as compared to shorter-acting opiates.

Nyswander and Dole operated on the premise that heroin addiction is in effect a metabolic disorder, comparable perhaps to diabetes. Large doses of methadone – 80 to 150mg – were used to normalise the disorder, as insulin is used for diabetes. They combined this theory of treatment with efforts at psychological counselling and social rehabilitation, including help and encouragement in finding work. Many of their patients benefited greatly from the treatment and were successfully re-integrated into “normal society”, such as it is. The use of the treatment spread, but was not necessarily implemented with the innovation displayed in the work of Nyswander and Dole. For example, more than half of the USA’s 120,000 methadone patients today are treated with dosages well below those recommended by their research.

To read the rest of this article and find out about methadone’s pros and cons and the trials of treatment, click here.

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