International Remembrance Day, 21st July -For those who have died from the War on Drugs – which is a war on people!


This is a speech spoken at a Remembrance Day event in London yesterday. It gives a personal point of view looking at how the War on Drugs -which is a war on people in every part of the world that has been happening for almost 100 years! Here is just one persons story of being inside this insane maelstrom.

My Name is Anna

My name is Anna and I call myself a drug user activist.

I have been a drug injector for over 30 years and a drug user activist for more than half of that.

In that time – like many of us here today – I have seen a lot of things….

And, like many of us here – I have also had some extraordinary relationships, encounters and random chances with many, many people who used drugs.

People who, for the most part – were not dodgy or crazy – well maybe just a little –

Who were not dirty,  lying or cheating horrible people –

But mostly passionate, caring, sensitive and generous people. People who – yes they may have been pushed to the brink –marginalised and isolated by a society that had to criminalise before it cared – judged before it understood; people who should have received better protection from our drug policies – rather than annihilation…..

People who I have loved and cared about, like we all have –and this is why we are here on this very important day today.

As a drug user activist for many years now I have given speeches and presentations at lots of places all over the country –and while every presentation is different – but this one is special.

It is special because this is the one time I can honestly truly stand up and say – loud and proud – how grateful and how fortunate I am to have made friendships with some of the best people in the world – other drug users – fuck – other junkies! – wonderful, courageous people who have often battled huge odds to still be here – today – and many who are literally here today and in this audience.

People who have found each other, often initially through their enjoyment or pain, their that sharing of an illegal substance. You might say prohibition has brought many of us together.

But prohibition has also meant that –many of these very same people – these special, wild and crazy characters – are NOT here today.

Because they are DEAD. Those people –and we all knew someone – who died directly because our insane drug policies continue to make the same mistakes over and over again – day in and day out –while people like I have just mentioned – die!

Think about this: every minute of every day –someones brother or sister is crying out for methadone but cant get it because (like in Russia) they have an idea that it should be kept illegal to stop drug users indulging themselves.

That someones father is being bundled up in a rug in Guatemala and kidnapped by a quazy religious cult who have financially fleeced the relatives by selling a story that incarceration in a blacked out house – against a persons will is the only way to save someone from drugs.

And that – in the filipines a childs mother and father have been shot dead in the street by a vigilante public who cheer the bandits on and tie big signs round their dead necks calling them pushers.

While here in London someones best buddy overdoses alone in a half way hostel because they are using benzos on top of the shitty blackmarket heroin that available in an effort to drown out the misery of life criminalized after yet another prison sentence.

Prohibition is killing our community – over and over, to quickly to count the numbers –only through days like this do we have an opportunity to really reflect on who these policies are really affecting –in real time.

The anger is real – no doubt about that – it is why I became a drug user activist. But I just want to quickly tell you –being an angry activist didn’t happen overnight. It was an accumulation of several lightbulb moments that happened to me – that made me realise – OMG – I do not deserve shit treatment from people and services just because I use drugs and supposedly broke a few rules.

I used to think – well, what could I expect if I did the wrong thing. Jeezus, surely I couldn’t expect to be treated well? I was in the wrong, after all. I didn’t see then that societys label of junkie –and all its connotations – ran so deeply in people – that I was being judged and sentenced by their ignorance.

Ignorance that could literally put my life at risk.

Ill just tell you very quickly about 2 of those litebulb moments:

The first one happened after I had just been diagnosed HIV positive –it was in 1995 and things were different back then –but stigma is stigma and it is still rife today as we know –no matter what its shade or location.

So, 1995, and it was 6 weeks after I had been diagnosed –my first dr appoint. And I went with to this dr appoint –in fact I went with my mum –and I was met by a female dr who proceeded to  hammer me, in the most humiliating way, with a series of 100 questions about my drug use, whether I was sharing needles, did I have anal sex –all delivered with the most accusatory tone I was stunned into virtual silence! My mum –after she picked herself and me – metaphorically -off the floor –said ‘excuse me – I don’t appreciate you speaking to my daughter in that way’; and later, after we left and went for coffee, I realized –what she in fact was brimming with –was a judgement: I was guilty, I was a junky, I had brought this on myself. I was the non deserving.

And I realized in a flash: OMG – I had gone to this dr as an open book – as vulnerable as one can be – we both were – I felt like my life was in her hands –and that she didn’t want it. I wasn’t like everyone else – I really was ‘the other’ and this could literally affect my life now.

It was a lightbulb moment.

Later when a friend and I were bemoaning the fact that there were no drug users speaking on world aids day, considering how we had seen its impact on the injecting community; my friend Andrea, had just been telling me about her husband who had just died of aids. How incredibly courageous he was (in fact John mordant was one of several drug user activists in the world who formed the first front line of user activism back in early 1990s.- also started Mainliners) And that it really felt like there was nowhere for people like him to be welcomed, understood, appreciated –like there was for gay men at the time.

She said to me pointedly “ Because we have heroes too”.

And tears started to well up in my eyes because all of a sudden I thought about all the wonderful people I knew, some of whom were now dead –who never got the appreciation, the respect, the support even the funeral they should have got – just because they used an illegal substance.

But as I said – drug user activism helps me to channel my anger, and has helped me to fight back in constructive ways rather than remaining in a self destructive spiral of guilt, confusion, thwarted ambition, rage.

And days like today are an inspiration – to see all the wonderful people I deeply respect here today –and to celebrate the lives of those who –tragically – and for which there really are no words – are not here today –

Thank you all for coming today to remember those who lived life on the edge –in ways we all sometimes dream about doing but don’t dare –

We will keep remembering them all.

Dedicated to Raffi Ballian – a Canadian masterclass of an activist who died of an overdose this year.

Pretty Pills? I knew it!

Some light relief for the pill munchers amongst us…Pills like we have never seen them before, honest!

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fstreetartglobe%2Fvideos%2F2023166277906788%2F&show_text=1&width=560

Ibogaine update

Well readers, I have a treat for you!

Ten years ago David Graham Scott (whom we have written about and written with on this website) screened a very personal documentary on channel

Documentary filmmaker David Graham Scott on his journey to rid himself of heroin and methadone addiction. David during the dream phase of the Ibogaine drug. Copyright david gillanders_photography 2003 Not to be reproduced, printed or published without prior consent from David Gillanders. m_ + 44 (0)7974 920 189 e_ david@davidgillanders.com

Documentary filmmaker David Graham Scott on his journey to rid himself of heroin and methadone addiction. Above: David during the dream phase of the Ibogaine drug in the film Detox or Die. Copyright 

4, about his own experience as a person struggling to finally quit using methadone -by using ibogaine. The film Detox or Die has since been viewed many, many thousands of times on the web and at film festivals and conferences. It is a really interesting, personal and thoughtful film about his attempt to embrace the spirit of Iboga, by using a guide, who stayed with him throughout the entire two day ordeal, something he filmed entirely.

Well, my treat for you in David’s follow up film made 10 years later. David not only talks about his own experience of staying drug free since then but he looks at Ibogaine in other treatment settings -one persons actual DIY treatment to cure their heroin addiction, another couple of guys who embarked on a ‘journey with ‘a guide’ whom they paid a couple of thousand pounds, someone who bailed halfway through the treatment, as well as talking to some other dependent drug users about kicking their habit and their hopes for ibogaine working for them.

Portrait of filmmaker David Graham Scott today

Portrait of filmmaker David Graham Scott today

It is a classic piece of work, expertly made by a pro, we are dead proud of him here at BP and happily I can provide you with the link to watch not just Detox or Die but the more recent Iboga Nites -which came out in 2013. David has already won numerous awards for the film and it should spark interest and debate for some time to come. Well worth a watch for anyone remotely interested in detoxing or the subject of drugs.

This comes from David’s website detailing information on the film Iboga Nites

“The psychedelic plant root hails from Africa where it has been used in religious ceremonies through countless generations. A burgeoning movement in the west has promoted iboga as a quick fix route to painless withdrawal.

Now David wants to find out how truly effective iboga is. In a Dutch suburb several addicts embark on the long night of psychedelic detox under the watchful eye of an experienced Iboga practitioner. One client collapses and ends up on life-support, the provider is jailed and David starts to question the safety of iboga treatment.

 The film culminates with a nerve-wracking iboga session in London where the director himself administers the treatment. How does the filmmaker weigh up the ethics of involving himself so deeply in this controversial detox option and what will be his final resolve on the efficacy of it?”

IBOGA NIGHTS from David Graham Scott on Vimeo.

Citric Acid in Heroin: How Much is too Much?

Hi again,

Now many of you will know about this video -and the information that came out a few years back on citric acid and heroin -regarding ‘How Much is Too Much?’. But there are still many people who didnt see it and many people who are still using too much citric acid, not realising that not only are they damaging their veins more, but they are actually damaging / reducing the quality of their heroin! Yes, it is true readers! If you use citric or vit C (which is the same but slightly less acidic thus you need a bit more when mixing up) when mixing up your brown, black or beige heroin (this does not affect white heroin which should dissolve without heat or citric), and you haven’t heard about this issue or seen the video -then you MUST take 10minutes out of your day and listen up!

 

Citric_sachets_small

Order your sterile Citric sachets to your home in discreet wrapping, from Exchange Supplies, the good guys in business http://www.exchangesupplies.org/shop.php

So, this is a really good video from Exchange Supplies, every users favourite organisation and at the forefront of developing really useful user friendly, health and harm reduction information and equipment for the drug using community and needle exhanges and drug services across the UK and worldwide.

They have made numerous videos but this is one of their most popular. It is a clear video shown in under 10 minutes,  that discusses the issue of citric acid (or vitamin C) -the powder many of us have to add to brown heroin in order to ‘break it down’ and make it work as an injectable solution. Now, we don’t of course need to do this with white heroin, but dark beige, brown or black heroin made up for injecting, will need citric acid or vitamin C added to it.

Now ok, we all know that. But what this video (and the research done at Exchange Supplies), they wanted to look into just HOW MUCH citric was enough.

 

It turns out that we all learnt 2 valuable lessons from ES working in the laboratory! Too much citric over the years -will fuck up your veins -and also your heroin – so there are 2 very good reasons to use less citric:

  1. to save your veins over the short and long term

  2.  To avoid destroying or reducing the quality of your heroin from over acidification

For further reading and to see the famous How Much is Too Much, Citic Video, click here.

Naloxone – the big hit with the long wait

Id like to discuss a campaign involving many members of the drug using community across the world. As far as campaigns go, this one should be a done deal. In fact it should of been snapped up as a central component in all our national and community drugs strategies years ago.  The benefits and results to be reaped from rolling out similar campaigns is nothing less than saving life itself and the prevention of repeated tragedy, trauma, gut-wrenching grief and endless pain and loss. What is the campaign? To get Naloxone, the drug that instantly brings a fully overdosed and dying person back to life in seconds, into the hands of every single heroin user and ideally, into the hands of their family and partners.

The reasons to implement and progress this campaigns’ agenda are, at first glance so crystal clear, so straightforward, so blindingly obvious that the average person could be forgiven for asking, “Just what is taking so long? – We need to empower people to save lives, naloxone works, its cheap and simple to use, so let’s do this!”

But, after we remove the blindingly obvious common sense and our societies desperate need to rollout these programmes in the face of rising overdose figures, we must question why we still have unacceptable dithering by authorities and a worrying lack of will to progress the agenda.

It must be considered that such delays carry the familiar hallmarks of the common ‘junkie stain’ or rather, the agenda that is stained or dismantled or even left to rot, simply through its association with drug users. However, this particular campaign, which has come in all sorts of shapes and guises, is gaining traction in areas all over the world and recently, finally, here in the UK too. It has the fangs of drug user activists in it all over the place, with programmes that are getting naloxone into the trained hands of policemen and women, family members and partners, pushing forward the idea of Naloxone as a free item or a purchase from a pharmacy by people, even bringing a used one back to get a new one etc.

There is bound to be something you can do in your own community to help push this agenda forward and to get Naloxone into the trained hands of at least every single heroin user in your neck of the woods, in the rollout towards Naloxone being in every hand, in every city across the world.

The International Doctors for Healthier Drug Policies is also taking up the mantel to push the Naloxone agenda, this article appeared the other day and gave a useful global overview. 

Naloxone*

Naloxone_banner

 

WE COULD INSTANTLY REDUCE THE NUMBER OF

OVERDOSE DEATHS IF THIS MEDICINE

WERE MORE WIDELY AVAILABLE

 

What do we do with a medicine that prevents certain death for people with a particular condition—and is safe, cheap, and easy to administer?

  1. Immediately make it accessible to those who can administer it when such a life-or-death situation arises.
  2. Make it available to no one except doctors and emergency room workers.
  3. Endlessly debate the particulars of how and when it should be widely introduced.

If you picked number one, that would seem to be a reasonable choice. Unfortunately, it would also be incorrect. With few exceptions, answers two or three apply in the vast majority of the world when it comes to the medicine naloxone.

Overdose remains a leading cause of death among people who use drugs, particularly those who inject. Increasing the availability and accessibility of naloxone would reduce these deaths overnight.

Naloxone is an effective opioid antagonist used to reverse the effects of opioid overdose. On a global scale, however, exactly how and where naloxone is used remains unclear. International Doctors for Healthier Drug Policies (IDHDP) is seeking to learn why this is and what can be done to change it.

Some form of community-based distribution programs for naloxone exist in over a dozen countries. But the quality of data pertaining to how naloxone is used is highly variable. Enhancing our knowledge about the use of naloxone will help us to better reap its benefits.

What we do know is that the availability of naloxone is growing in several countries. Scotland implemented a national program in 2010, and outcomes there have demonstrated its effectiveness in reducing drug overdose deaths. In China, it is available in an increasing number of hospitals. Canada and Estonia have pioneered programs on take-home naloxone.

And in the United States, policymakers called for greater availability and accessibility of naloxone after opioid overdose deaths more than tripled between 2000 and 2010. In some states, distribution expanded from emergency rooms, paramedic services, and needle-exchange programs to police stations. In Quincy, Massachusetts, all police began carrying naloxone [PDF] in 2010, leading to a 70 percent decrease in overdose deaths.

Last November, guidance from the World Health Organization recommended increased access to naloxone for people who use opioids themselves, as well as for their families and friends. Naloxone is also included on the WHO’sEssential Medicines List.

The role of naloxone in addressing opioid overdose was recognized for the first time in a high-level international resolution in March 2012. Members at the UN’s 55th commission on Narcotic Drugs unanimously endorsed a resolution promoting evidence-based strategies to address opioid overdose. Recently, the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA) published a very useful literature review of the effectiveness of take-home naloxone.

To build on these gains, we need more data. IDHDP wants to find more out about the availability and accessibility of this life-saving intervention. To that end, we’ve created the Global Naloxone Survey, an attempt to compile information about where naloxone is available, who can use it, and where it can be accessed with or without a prescription.

We then will analyze the results with the short-term goal of obtaining as much information as possible on how widely and readily available naloxone is. Subsequently, we intend to work to maximize both the availability and the accessibility of naloxone, particularly to those who are most likely to be present where and when an opioid overdose takes place.

This post first appeared on the website of International Doctors for Healthier Drug Policies

This talk on Naloxone was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently at one of the TED Conferences. In 2011, fatal drug overdoses in the UK (3,338) exceeded the number of road accident deaths (1,960). These deaths are preventable. Jamie Bridge talks here about how rethinking both product design and service design have the potential to save lives in the administration of overdose medication. Naloxone was developed in the 1960s to counter the effects of heroin overdose. It’s a staple part of ambulance crew kits, but those who need it face barriers to the drug at the point at which it could save their lives. Recently, there has been a shift in focus and design to ensure that naloxone is available to those likeliest to witness an overdose – drug users, their families and friends. The evidence shows that naloxone works, and that drug users can be empowered to save the lives of their friends.

Jamie Bridge is a passionate advocate for drug services and drug policy reform in order to protect the rights, health and well-being of vulnerable people around the world.

* Naloxone is the generic term, it is also known by its brand name which is Narcan.

 

A video for every bloke to have a look at -through the eyes of a woman

As a woman, it is always just part of your life; of course the younger you are the more regular the occurrences; sexual equality? where is it? Man oh man have we got a long way to go before women can simply walk down the street without being harassed, made to feel embarrassed, humiliated; women have to turn off their chance to maybe meet a nice person because they have grown up to be paranoid about what male attention in the street really means. And in bars, clubs, train stations, shops etc. For all the men who continue to do it -it means women are going to feel less and less like having any interaction with a stranger on the street at all; and, after this video, can you really blame her?

Published on 28 Oct 2014

Donate to Hollaback! https://donatenow.networkforgood.org/…
Creator/Director/Producer: Rob Bliss Creative- A Viral Video Agency – http://robblisscreative.com/
Business/Media Contact: rob@robblisscreative.com

Check this out injectors!

A groovy new piece of Kit that really gives you a good look into your venous system – possibly one of the best types on the market right now. At $30,000 a pop, it had better be good! When are they going to invent an app for vein finding???? Now that would be a good idea!

Succinct Explanation about the Many Misconceptions About ‘Addiction’

Check out another neatly defined, succinct and straightforward explanation of the roots of ‘addiction’ and just how society became laden with so many misconceptions about drug dependence or ‘addiction’. Dr Cart Hart has a new book out called High Price. Just 20 minutes long, this is a very useful listen for people wanting to know a bit of history around how we came to view ‘out of control drug addicts’ as the norm. He also mentions his fascinating research delivered over a few years around crack and crack users, which challenged many of our most deeply ingrained ideas about crack users. Get your facts up to date and have a listen..

Thanks to Vox.com for the article and video, though I think it originally appeared on TedsTalk.

Carl Hart is a neuroscientist and drug addiction expert at Columbia University. In a recent TEDMED talk, Hart spoke about drug addiction and the many misconceptions surrounding the topic — and how those misconceptions can mislead drug policy.

Hart went into neuroscience to cure the drug addiction he blamed for causing crime and poverty in his old Miami neighborhood. But when he began to work on the issue, he learned that his assumptions were wrong.

About 80 to 90 percent of the people who use illegal drugs don’t turn out addicts, Hart explained. As an example, Hart pointed to the three previous presidents, all of whom used drugs when they were younger. “Their drug use did not result in an inevitable downward spiral leading to debauchery and addiction,” Hart said. “And the experience of these men is the rule, not the exception.”

THE FINDINGS SHOW THE PROBLEMS ARE MUCH MORE COMPLICATED THAN SOME BELIEVE

As Hart explained, many of the current assumptions about drug addiction are based on old animal experiments from the 1960s and 1970s. In these tests, animals were put in a cage with a lever that they could pull for a shot of a drug. Researchers found the animals would pull the lever until they died from an overdose.

Hart said these animals were never presented with an alternative, though. In other experiments, animals were given another option: a mate or a sweet treat. At that point, the animals began choosing the non-drug alternative, and they didn’t take the drug until they died.

Hart followed up on these experiments with human participants in 2000 and 2012. His lab recruited meth and crack cocaine addicts, and the addicts were given the option to choose between a small amount of money or their drug of choice. When the money option was $5, they chose the money about half the time. When the money option was $20, they chose the money about eight out of 10 times.

The results, of course, don’t diminish the real problems of crime, poverty, and drug addiction in some of America’s communities. But the findings show the problems are much more complicated than some, including a younger Hart, believe.

 

Check out the useful flip cards and the rest of the article here.  Listen to Dr Carl Hart give a clear account of the many misconceptions around drug use and where they sprang from. 

 

Christiane F…A Bit of Junkie Film History

Christiane-FfgwI reckon a lot of people have wondered from time to time, whatever happened to Christiane F.

I always felt that this book – and film -had a profound effect on a lot of people.  Christiane -first came out as a book of course, and one worth reading because it was, as is often the case, a lot better than the film. The story for you young ‘ens out there, is about a 14 year old heroin addict living the life of a prostitute in the 24 hour, 7 day a week chaos that is a young junkies life. I say young coz as most junkies get older, life tends to slow down somewhat and is nowhere near as eventful as ones younger years on the gear and on the game….

“In the ’70’s and 80’s [Zoo Station]…was the place for kids, young kids on smack to be precise; buying, selling, shooting up, scamming, sleeping, nodding and overdosing, learning the rules of a game with some very serious consequences and a lot of unspoken rules.”

 

I’m digressing. Christiane F is about a group of misfits and invisible outsiders living inside and outside the Berlin ZOO train station; Now cleaned up considerably of all the ‘riff raff’ back then, in the ’70’s and 80’s it was the place for kids, young kids on smack to be precise, buying, selling, shooting up, scamming, sleeping, nodding and overdosing, learning the rules of a game with some very serious consequences and a lot of unspoken rules.

It is a seriously compelling book for reasons that you’ll have to decide for yourself as you find yourself being dragged under the bus that is Christiane’s life at 14. She is a real person, and this was a real story, an autobiography written by herself some years later, helped along a bit by a journalist. When she was in her early 20’s I believe, the film came out and the media storm that surrounded it had a major impact on her life. In the book/film, we find her at the end….Ok, Ok, I wont spoil it, suffice to say that she struggles with dependency her whole adult like so many of us.

She travelled the world with her money from the book/film, met loads of people, many who kept wanting to give her drugs, and she used drugs all around the world. German critics regularly gave her a hard time especially when they learnt she was back in a methadone clinic somewhere or just back on the gear or just snapped pics of her visual dramas for the papers. Then at around late 30’s or something she had a kid and left Germany because the wonderful papers were already deciding if she would be a fit mother….

PICTURES OF CHRISTIANE – slideshow


So she had her son in Amsterdam (could be a bad place to go methinks? But the Dutch are sooo civilised so I really catch her drift) and then went on a methadone programme as she had got back on the H at some stage there, only to find herself in a battle with social services in Germany and lost her son! interfering Bastards! I will guess we will have to read book 2 to find out if it was a case of need be or not because, yessiree! She has written a long-awaited follow up fans!

CHRISTIANE AT 51 YEARS OLD IN BERLIN: Promoting her new book.

 

I only found all this out recently as it goes. I thought somehow she made a miraculous recovery and became a writer living out her life…Well, I didn’t know where but just last year, I discovered that she had brought out this other book, based on her life since the first book, because sooooo many peeps were interested in what happened to her.

But before I fill in with a bit of info about her new life and book, (Christiane F; My 2nd Life)  here is the film. For any teen junkies or young ones on the game, it’ll touch a few chords and for anyone else, it will touch many more. Its powerful, though maybe a little dated now, but some things never change. It shows us too how young we are at that age, how vulnerable to predators, and how we always think everything is going to work out, that we know the score when we sooo don’t!  Well folks, here is a full dubbed version of her film (original is in German, this one is dubbed not with subtitles). Some of the actors were real junkies from the Zoo apparently.

 Click here for Christiane F’s interview last year with Vice Magazine about her life since the book and film.

And news of Detlef!!

Fuck, these days you can even say hello in person to Christiane on her FaceBook page which she is regularly updating. Go on, you know you want to!

RARE PICTURE OF CHRISTIANE’S BOYFRIEND DETLEF: He was 14 as well and paying for gear as a rent boy, on show behind the lavs at Zoo station along with lots of other young heroin addicted boys at the time. These days he is alive thank god , and apparently mmarried with kids and drives a buus for the disabled.

 

 

HIV/AIDS in 1985; No Really, We Will Never Forget…

It was 1988, in Wick, a small highland town in the far north of Scotland. My wife’s ex boyfriend had been diagnosed as being HIV positive. We knew we had to get tested. My wife was from the infamous period in Edinburgh period of shooting gallery’s where it was so hard to find works (syringes) that people would stand in a line and the dealer would cook up the hits using te same syringe on everyone.

There was a prototype of a needle exchange that had been running from an area called the Grassmarket in Edinburgh but the police were routinely arresting people who visited it. The police eventually closed it down in the early 1980’s. The cops were very hard on junkies who were injectors.

It was a strange time where you could be busted for having traces of gear or even a needle packet on your person. But the drug that was the real gold dust for the using community was Diconol which were bright pink tablets (I think that were made by Roche -dipionone hydrochloride).

Opus Morphia from David Graham Scott on Vimeo.

This film was made by David around the time (1985). Incredibly, he did not go to film school.

It was a really strong opiate analgesic, a mixture of Cyclomorph and a sort of anti-emetic) and the rush was the reason people bought it. It was like a religious experience, you generally felt you were in the company of God for a few moments,  it was a truly beautiful sensation, the best I have ever had in my life.

So anyway, my girlfriend and I went to get tested. I wasn’t really bothered about it, I never even thought I’d be positive, and neither did my girlfriend.

Three weeks later the results were in and it was my girl that got the bad news. She was positive and  I wasn’t. I said I would stick behind her no matter what happened; and typical of her (remains anonymous), she took it all in her stride. God only knows how, as things would get a lot, lot worse.

I would go with her to the HIV clinic and all the positive people had to sit along a wall. There was those old-fashioned weighing scales measuring height and weight, and without any privacy whatsoever, they would announce your weight, like at school, and because everyone always went there  coz they had to for their methadone (there was almost nothing on offer then), it was like some cattle market.

Gallows humour would run loose among the patients, as is the Scottish way, topped off with small junkie self platitudes such as ‘thank fuck I ain’t as bad as him’ .  Comments bounced around the echoing hospital hallways like” Oh, he is going down….61Kilograms today laddy, that’s quite a drop to tell ya ma” or “Oh,lookee there, she has that whatsimacallit, the scabby things, she must be getting AIDS nurse, right or no? “, and on and on it went. People just wasted away in front of you, on parade for all of us to see.

 

Episode 2 will tell you more from David of the shameful story of Edinburgh and HIV/AIDS in the 1980’s and should be about a week behind this.  

HOWEVER!!!

You can see more about David Graham Scott’s exemplary career in filmmaking, covering various issues but covering brilliantly his experiences as a junkie, or indeed battling ‘junkdom’.

In particular the famous ‘Detox or Die (his personal experience of undergoing an Ibogaine detox on film a decade ago (available to view today free online and on DGS’s Vimeo channel to this blog on INPUD’s webpage. This just released film (which you can read about on the link provided) called Iboga Nights. It is the culmination of three long years of in-depth research into the drug Iboga and the lives and detoxes of the accompanying clutch of courageous, wonderful characters involved in the film, the much called for sequel Iboga Nights (google it but we will review it shortly) was a big success on the documentary film circuit recently winning much deserved awards and acclaim.  BP will cover this next in more detail. If this has whetted your appetite, look for David Graham Scott on Facebook and speak to him directly! Or you will find much covering both films and more by googling it.

 

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